Cedars and Pines?

Discussion in 'Whitetail Management' started by Critter, Jan 25, 2005.

  1. Critter

    Critter Life Member

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    This is probably a stupid question, but is there any way to grow cedars or pines in an already established timber. I've got ten acres, but its all mature trees. I'm trying to figure out a way to "thicken" it up somewhat give the deer a little more sense of security. Any suggestions?
    CRITR
     
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  3. 5465

    5465 Split_G3

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    3 years ago when i bought my property i did exactly what you are talking about. i went behind my father-in-laws house and dug up a mixture of evergreen and blue spruce, about 8 of each, and all were about 4-5 feet tall. it was november when i dug them up and planted them on my property and they haven't grown much in 3 years, of course, but thay have grown a litlle and none, except for 2, have appered to die. the 2 that have died, a little forky thought it would be hilarious to rub his tiny little antlers on my freshly planted trees, thay haven't completely died but they have to be just barely hanging on.

    i don't know about the woods being fully matured, my property is about 65% mature, but i still don't see why it wouldn't work, it's definetly worth the try. good luck to ya!
     
  4. bjkpharmd

    bjkpharmd New Member

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    Critr- Are there any trees crowded or less desired trees that you can cut? Think timber stand improvement or harvest a few to give yourself some sunlight. Let the tops of harvested trees create structure or cut some trees with a hinge so they stay alive but with the crown on the ground. You'll have a hard time keeping pines alive unless fenced but natural browse and thickness will return with sunlight.
     
  5. Critter

    Critter Life Member

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    There are a-lot of trees I could cut to provide some light below, but there's just so many of them I think I'd have to clear out some fairly large areas to have much affect. I'm trying to convince my wife to let me plant my backyard in cedars or pines, it's the only clearing I have other than the front yard.........my woes seem to be falling on deaf ears though. [​IMG]
    CRITR
     
  6. Ghost

    Ghost Life Member

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    Jamie...check on a cost share program for a windbreak if it is close to your home. I put in about $1400 worth of trees at a 75 percent cost share. Your wife may like that idea?
     
  7. Rudd

    Rudd Life Member

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    I did the same as Ghost this last year. The local ASCS office was more than helpful. It was a pain planting them all but well worth it in the long run.
     
  8. MN Slick

    MN Slick PMA Member

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    How long does it take for cedars to grow large enought to provide good cover for deer?
     
  9. tejay

    tejay Guest

    we did that also buying trees from the dnr. andplanted about 1500 trees last spring and amost all of them are still alivve cept for a few the atv hit........... butother then that the deer havnt touch the pines because of the food plots i put around them to keep them away from it.......
     
  10. Old Buck

    Old Buck Life Member

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    I've been working on the same goal for years on a number of timber spots. So far the cedar haven't grown a lot and many eventually die. Even if they survive in a timber the density of the needles will be proportional to the sunlight, nutrients and moisture available. I'd recommend calling your district forester, scheduling a walk in the woods and seeing if tsi is appropriate. I've been doing lots of tsi and it can make a huge difference in density of the understory, health of your remaining oak, acorn production and general density of cover.

    Old Buck
     

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