Cereal Grains and cover crops

Discussion in 'Dbltree's corner' started by dbltree, Aug 25, 2006.

  1. goatman

    goatman I hunt days ending in Y

    Messages:
    2,223
    Likes Received:
    515
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    east of big river
    I would think mowing high couldn't hurt. Like deer eating it off. Paul said one time that deer browse cereal rye till about 12" high. Protein level drops after that.
     
  2. AdBot Guest Advertisement

  3. risto2351

    risto2351 Active Member

    Messages:
    2,469
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    N.E. Iowa
    I am afraid to touch it with colder temps in a few weeks plus how will the peas and radishes react?
     
  4. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,323
    Likes Received:
    1,922
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Central, IA
    Peas and radish are both "forage" technically. Can take some abuse. This is one of those scenarios with cost/benefit for sure. Weighing it out. If ur rye is extremely tall & looking like it's not being touched - I might consider it. It's going to set everything else back for sure. Pics be helpful and if I saw em I'd be happy to say what I'd do based on pics if it were mine. Based on a "guess"- I'm leaning towards not mowing IMO but picture will speak for itself if able.
     
  5. MNbuckhunter

    MNbuckhunter Member

    Messages:
    732
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    18
  6. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,323
    Likes Received:
    1,922
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Central, IA
    Man, that's a really tough one. Ok- last photo, which is October 4 - obviously the most recent growth. Of course the other pics are nothing close to needing mowed but Those are early. Now- from what I see in the pic with taller rye - I don't see peas or radish real thick in there. Hardly notice them.
    If they are thicker than I see or notice- I personally would not mow. If it's essentially all rye- I might take a "few inches off". Thankfully- u r kinda splitting hairs and on fence. U r in MN so gonna get colder faster than down here too so I have to adjust my thinking some. Hmmm- if it's mainly all rye, warm ahead- I'd do it soon if ur gonna. Post results. Good luck!
     
  7. Central Iowa

    Central Iowa Administrator

    Messages:
    4,272
    Likes Received:
    92
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Central Iowa
    Exactly x2
     
  8. MNbuckhunter

    MNbuckhunter Member

    Messages:
    732
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    18
    There should be plenty of peas and radishes in there. Did the same as Dbltree said with 50# rye, 50# oats, 50# peas and 5# GHFR and red clover.

    I will be headed down there Friday. There are actually 2 plots about the same size . Maybe I will mow about 1/2 of each plot and see what happens??? I don't know yet...
     
  9. DannyBoy

    DannyBoy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,955
    Likes Received:
    30
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Too far from where I hunt...
    I'm on the "mow" bandwagon, as long as the forecast says it will get several growing days right off the bat. That rye will continue to grow on most warm days all the way thru November as long as there's not a real deep freeze, so I'd be taking a chance in order to get some sunlight to your more valuable winter forage.

    Figure out an avg height on peas and radish and mow above that, maybe?
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2015
  10. magnus

    magnus PMA Member

    Messages:
    165
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    Soap Creek Twsp
    Agreed....you could go either way. Leave it alone.... or else just mow it high to stimulate new growth. Are you seeing deer avoiding this field due to rye being too mature?
    Curious what your per-acre seed mix was? Just doesn't look like much radishes and peas growing in there.
     
  11. risto2351

    risto2351 Active Member

    Messages:
    2,469
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    N.E. Iowa
    How high does rye have to be before the deer will avoid it? I really hate mowing it this time of year especially with the peas and radishes. My pull behind will only go 5 - 6 inches high.
     
  12. magnus

    magnus PMA Member

    Messages:
    165
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    Soap Creek Twsp
    I'd suggest looking in the field for signs of browsing....or not. Even a camera set on field scan would give you a good idea of usage. If they're avoiding the field, then mowing might be best option. But they also may be using it just fine...and you don't need to do anything besides get some stands hung and go hunt it!!
     
  13. MNbuckhunter

    MNbuckhunter Member

    Messages:
    732
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I haven't been down to the farm since Sept 20th. My dad was down there last weekend and took that picture of the field. I do have a plot watcher set up on each plot. Also that picture was taken from an area where deer do not come out so maybe the field is being used further into the plot. Either way I will check the field and the plot watchers. I believe my pull behind can mow 8" high on max setting. Guess it will have to be a judgement call based on my findings. Thanks for the input.
     
  14. MO-APE

    MO-APE Member

    Messages:
    392
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    NoMo
    Just a reminder of DblTree's Drought Mix for those of you struggling with failed plots and lack of moisture. You should be able to get some decent germination if soil temps stay above 55-60ish and you get moisture. Obviously don't expect significant growth this late in the year, but something is better than bare fields (sorry, can't find Paul's original posting to link). In a pinch, I would probably just go with straight winter rye.

    Drought Mix

    Winter rye 50-80#'s per acre (56#'s = a bushel)
    Spring oats 80-120#'s per acre (32#'s = a bushel)
    Austrian Winter Peas or 4010/6040 Forage peas 20-80#'s per acre
    Red Clover 8-12#'s per acre or white clover at 6#'s per acre
    Groundhog Forage Radish 5#'s per acre

    Plant in late August to early September, if following well fertilized brassicas only 100-200#'s of urea may be needed but first time plantings may need to be fertilized and limed as the noted for the brassicas.
     
  15. Jbohn

    Jbohn Active Member

    Messages:
    775
    Likes Received:
    210
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Pike , County Illinois
    Has anybody substituted alfalfa for the red clover in this Mix ? I was thinking of trying it ? I have a hill top that has just been a son of a buck to get going because of moisture.. I'm think of possibly planting Alfa Rack in this mix and was wondering if it would work ? Does any body know the grazing alfalfa in Alfa Rack I my be able to get separate I know I need something with good root system in this plot just to dry.. Thanks Guys
     
  16. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,323
    Likes Received:
    1,922
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Central, IA
    Yep. Be fine. I've done legumes all the way from reds, whites, alsike, trefoil, sanfoin & alfalfa all with success. Dry areas if u wanted other options to alfalfa is red & Alice white clover. I do those with alfalfa often. Alfalfa prefers baling vs mowing but if u cut more often be ok. (If bale, make sure u keep up with p&k & ph levels.
     
  17. arm

    arm Leg

    Messages:
    1,150
    Likes Received:
    259
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    south central iowa
    Starting the dbltree rotation this fall in a new 2.5 acre plot. What can I plant now in prep for it...is there anything outside the mix that I can do now the might help with weeds or grasses and can be tilled under? It is only a couple months until I would start so maybe do nothing but just be extra diligent about prepping the site until then.
     
  18. Daver

    Daver PMA Member

    Messages:
    5,746
    Likes Received:
    945
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Iowa City
    You could till it now and go with something easy, cheap and quick like oats for the next 2-3 months. If you are going full Dbltree rotation, then I would envision something like this for you...

    1/3 of the plot - Clover, which is most easily established by planting a clover/rye mix in the late summer of the year and then terminating the rye the following spring...or not. You can alternatively just let the rye grow and then die off on it's own next summer...at which point you will have a beautiful clover field emerge.

    1/3 of the plot - brassicas in the fall, then rotated into something like berseem clover for 3-4 months next spring until you rotate into a clover/rye mix late next summer. Aim to plant in late-July, early-August.

    1/3 of the plot - clover/mix late this summer, late-August, early-September and then brassicas go in late July next year.

    You could also "short time" some beans in right now and then there is something growing now that is also adding nitrogen to the soil and feeding deer too.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2016
  19. Central Iowa

    Central Iowa Administrator

    Messages:
    4,272
    Likes Received:
    92
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Central Iowa
    Excellent advice I've done both of these options in similar circumstances. Quick cheap and easy.
     
  20. arm

    arm Leg

    Messages:
    1,150
    Likes Received:
    259
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    south central iowa
    Thanks guys. I'm going to try RR beans. Worse case scenario, they've all been eaten up but I've keep the area good and killed.
     
  21. risto2351

    risto2351 Active Member

    Messages:
    2,469
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    N.E. Iowa
    Everything with this rotation is spot on, but by experience I would not let the rye just die on its own. I have done it a couple of times but depending on what you use for machinery the dried up rye can make a real problem trying to disk everything up and getting it ready for the next crop. Just my .02.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice