Clover

Discussion in 'Dbltree's corner' started by dbltree, Jun 11, 2006.

  1. hillrunner

    hillrunner PMA Member

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    Approximately what size are your micro plots? It looks like they're holding up to pressure well.
     
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  3. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Small. Those pictured are probably 15 yards x 20 yards, 5 yards x 80 yards, 20 yards x 20 yards, 50 yards x 15 yards. That's just a sample.
    Here's the deal though. I have a lot of them. It spreads the deer out. During the rut it helps facilitate movement (i'll get bucks on camera checking every single one of them). I also have a ton of other food so they don't just sit there and eat it to the ground.
    Personally, I have zero farms with big timber so I have adapted my hunting accordingly and this seems to work well for me most of the time.
     
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  4. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    Anyone use imox before? (Lots of brand names for this). I’ve always done clethodim & crop oil & just mowed broadleaves. Buddy showed up to help & had some. I swear he said his little container said “4-5 oz per acre”. Label has some crazy high rates of 64-128 oz per acre though. I have no clue if he was either: 1) way off or 2) it really is 64-128 oz per acre & this stuff is LUDICROUS EXPENSIVE?!?!?
    Well- he sprayed 2 weeks ago. Bro was mowing today & it did nothing. Zero. Didn’t touch weeds one bit.
    So- $300/gallon- label says 64-128 oz per acre. 4-5 oz clearly did nothing. I don’t get confused on herbicides often but this is a new one for me and a no go based on 1st experience
    https://www.keystonepestsolutions.c...nd-900?zenid=f1ec7d7dcf4727604ca11b2f165b7a6f

    . [​IMG][​IMG]




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  5. Tmayer13

    Tmayer13 PMA Member

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    Mowed for the last time today! If you look closely you can see the deer have kept the clover at Bay. Did not have very many clover heads but mowed it for broadleaf control! [​IMG][​IMG]

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  6. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I often get asked about foodplots in the timber. Best bet is clover IMO. Here's a plot at my house inside the timber in a little clearing I made. As you can see, it is doing well. Clover can handle shade better than pretty much anything else. [​IMG][​IMG]

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  7. Bill-M

    Bill-M New Member

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    What is the earliest you have frost seeded clover? Not planning on it till early March but these temps have me wondering.
     
  8. Tmayer13

    Tmayer13 PMA Member

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    I dont actually think there is a definitive answer to this question. My only fears about this time of year would be birds, possibility of water run off(harder ground and maybe some rain??) or also the chance with a warmer winter maybe germination then a chance of the young plant dying(dont actually know if this can happen, but make sense in my brain)[/QUOTE]
     
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  9. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    I’d avoid doing it now. Agree on above. Even if it got in soil perfectly - would lose some seed germination. It wouldn’t be a failure & u would have some grow but I personally would Wait until february or March if possible.
     
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  10. Daver

    Daver PMA Member

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    Back when I didn't know any better, I put some down in late Dec/early Jan. I got some germination, but not ideal. You are better off in late Feb/early March IMO. Whenever the overnight temps are at, or below, 32 degrees and the daytime temps are in the 40's or even 50's. I also have had good success broadcasting over a thin cover of snow that then melts off the next day or so.
     
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  11. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have much better luck conventionally planting clover in spring as opposed to frost seeding. Just seem to get better stands.

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  12. Bill-M

    Bill-M New Member

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    Thank you everyone for sharing your wisdom. Will be putting down some lime and thought just crossed my mind beings temps have been mild and wondered if anyone had ever tried it before. Will do as planned though and wait till March.

    IowaBowHunter the plan is to frost seed into some existing clover already established, just have a couple sparse spots. I will be establishing another small plot that I have not made my mind up about if I want to frost seed, conventional seed or try a combo. Thanks again guys, you all are a wealth of knowledge.
     

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