CWD

Discussion in 'Iowa Whitetail Conference' started by MN Hunter, Jan 19, 2017.

  1. 4DABUCKS

    4DABUCKS Active Member

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    We all hear you guys concerns, it's a bad deal regardless of how the dnr/hunters/landowners handle the situation. Do yourselves a favor and contact as many of your friends/family members and neighbors as possible and get to a meeting tonight! It's easy to post and talk on a forum, trust me in this situation actions are gonna speak much louder than words typed on a whitetail forum. We can be our own worst enemy and sit back and let what ever happens happen, or we can choose to take action and get involved.
    For starters get that email sent out, that alone is the highest impact we can do from home.
    Good luck to those of you who hunt and or own land in neia.
    For those who are gonna take the 5 minutes to send emails, remember just like those that are going to the meeting tonight, be respectful and courteous. Those who can make decisions will remember that much more than someone coming across as an -sshole!
     
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  3. Big Benny

    Big Benny New Member

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    What is gonna happen when someone shoots a booner or even the next state record on one of these hunts?
     
  4. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Well-Known Member

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    If they want older deer, it's gonna be harder. Go watch any shotgun group, right or wrong (I have my opinion but whatever)- most of what they shoot are fawns or 1-2 year old does. I'd guess, based on years of seeing what they shoot, it's 50% fawns and year old deer. 1 reason is, those are the stupidest deer that don't yet know how to escape deer drives, really easy to kill. A 5 year old doe will usually outsmart the groups. Why, when you look at stats, the button buck kill is actually a really high amount of the kill.
    Here's my thing, I don't know how bad CWD is in the wild. I've spoke to folks that say out west, where CWD has been for years, they might have some minor die off from year to year. Well heck, I have minor die off already from EHD. What are folks proposing we do about that? I've had years with 50% die off, in ONE SINGLE YEAR with miles of river smelling death. Seen areas with 70% die off of EHD if I had to guess or ballpark it. No cure essentially, so what's a guy do???? So, CWD, NO CURE, stays in the soil, can be transferred to other locations from things like crows, etc. Is there really anything we can do? Is it as serious (like wiping out half a deer herd in a season like EHD has on multiple occasions I've seen) as EHD? Does it really do any good to wipe out the deer in CWD areas considering it's stuck in the soil "forever" and it can be transmitted easily? I don't know the answers but common sense has me wondering "is there anything folks can do and does shooting all your deer make any good sense?". Dunno.
     
  5. DGorman

    DGorman Member

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    I hunt in Jones county so cwd isn't there yet but I don't see it stopping anytime soon. I expressed concern last night about killing all the deer since that was what Wisconsin did and it doesn't seem to help. I said I hadn't seen their plan of attack here. He told me to stop hanging out in coffee shops and do some reading. I asked if there was a plan and he said it was on the DNR website. Here is a link but it's from 2010.

    http://www.iowadnr.gov/Portals/idnr/uploads/Hunting/disease/cwd_joint_plan.pdf

    It's 28 pages and I haven't read it all yet, but in my opinion it validates my concerns. Specifically these parts.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I have no answers, but I don't believe killing nearly all the deer is a viable option.
     
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  6. Droptines

    Droptines Member

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    Reading an article in my March Bowhunter magazine; says CWD was first diagnosed in humans in 1920. It's a brain prion disease with no cure. The prions cannot be destroyed by boiling, alcohol, acid, standard autoclaving methods, or radiation. In fact infected brains that have been sitting in formaldehyde for decades can still transmit spongiform disease. There is no study claiming the meat from CWD is safe for human consumption.
     
  7. HorseDoctor

    HorseDoctor PMA Member

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    Prion related diseases have been identified in humans as well as sheep, cattle and cervids (deer/elk/moose etc.) for a very long time. I don't believe that there is anything definitive to say that they are the same prion that causes all the diseases. Suspicion is, there are slight differences between species. There are also no studies stating that meat from a CWD infected cervid is not safe for human consumption! Prion related diseases have been around for quite a while but only relatively recently has the causative agent (prion) been identified. In spite of all the speculation and hysteria, very little is known about prion diseases, a lot like viral diseases were 75-100 years ago. Until more is known, there is little evidence that hysteria and panic will be intelligent ways to deal with the problem. That's just not good science! There is little evidence that mass slaughter is a viable, or even intelligent approach to dealing with prion related diseases. Killing all the animals and burning the carcasses or burying them covered in lye may help contain hoof and mouth disease (virus) in cattle but will do little or nothing to control CWD. Let the scientists do the research and sooner or later an intelligent approach may be identified. Mass slaughter and testing only serves to identify the presence of the disease and has not been shown to be an effective control procedure. In the meantime; I think there are a lot more scary things going on in my world than CWD. A lot of things will kill you, worry is one of them. I choose to not to worry as much about contracting CWD than what hysteria will do to the beloved recreational activity of deer hunting, not to mention the gastronomical delight of deer eating. If you choose to not eat deer, very well, then please don't hunt them. I'm OK with your choice... ;)
     
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  8. Fishbonker

    Fishbonker Well-Known Member

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    And I'm Ok with your choice. I will still hunt them and eat them if the CWD test I'm willing to pay for comes back negative. I try extremely hard not be an alarmist or hysterical about anything. I'm not going to let my love of hunting deer or my delight in eating them cloud my judgment.;)
     
  9. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Well-Known Member

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    Prions killing things identified, based on above "in the 1920's". They found in deer or sheep or WHATEVER, sometime around the 70's or give or take a decade (or century, really doesn't matter with this point).....
    COULD IT BE (no idea, just thinking out loud) that we found out how to identify a "PRION" in the last century? Could it be, these "PRION" things could have been around for 10,000, 50,000 or 1,000 years, WHATEVER and we simply just didn't know what the heck they were????? If that's the case, could this disease be more prevelant than we realize and, considering it stays in soil "forever" - WHATEVER and things like crows can transmit it.... COULD the reality be - there's ZERO we can do and "DEER ERADICATION ZONES" really will have no impact in reality? I am not saying this is correct BUT, based on some of these FACTS we know (some of what I said is fact as I understand & some of what I'm saying is me interjecting some thinking/logic).... What evidence out there points to the action plan of "ERADICATION ZONES" being the solution? To me, as a critical thinker, I don't see the evidence here. I don't know the answer, I'm not an expert or scientist but just trying to use my degree from the College of Common Sense and think through this. As of TODAY, my Degree in Common Sense or if I was a "JUDGE & JURY" - I'm not seeing evidence that supports Deer Eradication Zones. PLEASE correct me if you feel different or think there's info that folks need to better understand that would change that assessment.
     
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  10. Fishbonker

    Fishbonker Well-Known Member

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    I can only point to New York. They had an out break in wild deer near a fenced deer farm. They went in and killed a bunch of wild deer as soon as it was found (2002?). This year there were (off the top of my head I read this a few weeks ago) about 1,000 deer tested the majority of them adult bucks (>/=3 yo) and they had zero positive tests. These were hunter killed deer in season. Not only did they kill deer in the immediate area when CWD was found they put heavy restrictions and heavy enforcement on bringing dead deer to New York from CWD areas.

    In my opinion the reason Wisconsin has such an ongoing problem with CWD is the disease was in the State for up to 10 years before it was found. Kill all you want but if it is in the ground, it's in the ground. I can't speak for what is happening in Minnesota but I believe Iowa is trying to follow what worked in New York.

    There was a question a few post back about the prion evolving. I speculated that even if the "genetically resistant" deer were the only ones left the prion would eventually change or mutate to be infective. This I can not prove, but as has been pointed out by others "wasting disease" has been around in several species including humans for a very long time. Something changed to make the prion infective to all these species, either the prion changed or the species changed to become more susceptible.
     
  11. Bowman D

    Bowman D Member

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    CWD has been confirmed in Iowa for quite a while now. I think if we were going to do the New York route it should have been done a long time ago. With the addition of the Elkader positive test, it has spread way out further than what was previously thought. I think it's too late for the mass eradication effort. I hope this is not the case, but my gut tells me it is. To be honest, knowing the terrain in that area I'm not real sure they could ever do it if they had to. I realize deer herd up in the winter, etc. but it would still be nearly impossible. As far as the whole prion topic, I have no idea! ....but neither does anybody else.
     
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  12. boneman

    boneman boneman

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    Update from cwd hunt around elkader, none tested positive but the yearlings weren't tested. We'll see what happens from here, not sure what the right approach is but it's getting a little too close to where I hunt! I'd go insane if there were no deer to bow hunt, it's my life!
     
  13. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

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    March 16, 2017

    Latest news on Chronic Wasting Disease in Iowa

    Twelve Iowa deer test positive from 2016-17 hunting seasons
    The DNR is closing the books on 2016 chronic wasting disease monitoring efforts, collecting 4,879 tissue samples from wild deer. From those, 12 samples tested positive for the disease; test results are pending on deer from a handful of counties, including a few dozen from a special deer collection effort in Clayton County.

    “We are extremely grateful for the cooperation of hunters and landowners in the region who gave us samples and who allow hunters access to their property during the collection effort,” said Terry Haindfield, wildlife biologist with the Iowa DNR for a six-county region in northeast Iowa.

    Chronic wasting disease first appeared in Iowa's wild deer herd in 2013. Each year since, the DNR has placed extra emphasis on finding the extent to which disease is in the area, and to help slow the spread by removing additional adult deer from the local population.

    What hunters can do to help

    Haindfield said hunters play an important role in addressing CWD in Iowa. To help slow its spread, hunters should remove any mineral blocks and feeders that concentrate deer and increase the chances of spreading any disease. Hunters can also provide tissue samples to the DNR for testing, and report any sick or emaciated deer to the DNR.

    “Deer hunting is one of Iowa’s great traditions. We want to educate and work with our hunters so we continue to have the best deer herd in the country for generations to come,” said Haindfield.

    Learn more from the DNR Chronic Wasting Disease website.

    Next steps for CWD
    The Iowa DNR has a goal to collect around 5,000 deer samples each year from across the state. For the 14 counties near areas where CWD has been confirmed, quotas range from 50 samples to 500. The remaining counties have a quota of 15 samples each.

    These CWD focus areas include: the northeast quarter of Pottawattamie County; Keokuk County; an area surrounding the four corners where Winnebago, Worth, Hancock and Cerro Gordo counties adjoin; Wayne, Appanoose, Davis, Wapello and portions of Monroe, Jefferson and Van Buren counties; and Winneshiek, Howard, Buchannan, Delaware, Scott, Clinton, Jackson, Dubuque, Clayton and Allamakee counties.

    The disease has been found in southeastern Nebraska near the Missouri River, which will begin a new focus area along Iowa’s western border from Fremont to Woodbury County.

    Special Collection Effort Results
    Allamakee: Jan. 21 – Feb. 5

    • 263 deer harvested
    • 202 sampled (1 no sample)
    • 60 fawns
    • 125 permits
    • 520 collectors (hunters)
    • 928 tags
    • 1 positive
    Clayton County: Feb. 18 – March 5


    • 158 deer harvested
    • 138 sampled (86 results pending)
    • 20 fawns
    • 123 permits
    • 456 collectors (hunters)
    • 796 tags
    • Zero positives so far
    [​IMG]
    Understanding the differences between two deer diseases in Iowa

    According to Haindfield, Iowa hunters still have some confusion about the difference between chronic wasting disease and epizoic hemorrhagic disease. "We need to continue to explain the differences so our hunters are more knowledgeable if either disease does come into their area,” Haindfield said.

    Chronic wasting disease is caused by a misshapen protein that is ingested by the animal from the environment, takes 18-36 months for clinical signs to show, and is always fatal. It has shown up in the wild deer herd in limited areas in the state. Epizoic hemorrhagic disease is spread by a biting insect (a midge), is often worse during drought years and can occur throughout Iowa. Find out more about deer diseases.

    https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/IACIO/bulletins/18d6049

    TUESDAY, MARCH 14, 2017

    Iowa 12 deer test positive for chronic wasting disease from 2016-17 hunting seasons

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/03/iowa-12-deer-test-positive-for-chronic.html

    Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion aka mad deer disease

    THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2017

    Norway CWD Skrantesjuke: VKM report supports the National Veterinary Institute perception management

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/03/norway-cwd-skrantesjuke-vkm-report.html

    MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2017

    Wyoming CWD Postive Mule Deer Doe Near Pinedale

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/03/wyoming-cwd-postive-mule-deer-doe-near.html

    MONDAY, MARCH 20, 2017

    Wisconsin CWD TSE Prion Annual Roundup 441 positive

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/03/wisconsin-cwd-tse-prion-annual-roundup.html

    MONDAY, MARCH 13, 2017

    CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD TSE PRION UDATE March 13, 2017

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/03/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-tse-prion.html

    FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 2017

    Nebraska Tests confirm spread of CWD to Lancaster County

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/03/nebraska-tests-confirm-spread-of-cwd-to.html

    THURSDAY, MARCH 09, 2017

    Missouri MDC REPORTS TWO CASES OF CWD IN ST. CLAIR COUNTY

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/03/missouri-mdc-reports-two-cases-of-cwd.html

    WEDNESDAY, MARCH 01, 2017

    South central Pennsylvania Captive Deer Tests Positive for Chronic Wasting Disease

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/03/south-central-pennsylvania-captive-deer.html

    SATURDAY, MARCH 04, 2017

    Maryland DNR Six Deer Test Positive for Chronic Wasting Disease

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/03/maryland-dnr-six-deer-test-positive-for.html

    FRIDAY, MARCH 31, 2017

    TPWD UPDATE CWD TSE Prion 49 confirmed cases and unwanted firsts for Texas

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/03/tpwd-update-cwd-tse-prion-49-confirmed.html

    FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2017

    TEXAS, Politicians, TAHC, TPWD, and the spread of CWD TSE Prion in Texas

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/01/texas-politicians-tahc-tpwd-and-spread.html

    MONDAY, MARCH 13, 2017

    CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD TSE PRION UDATE March 13, 2017

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/03/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-tse-prion.html

    SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 2017

    CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD TSE PRION GLOBAL UPDATE JANUARY 14, 2017

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/01/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-tse-prion.html

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/
     
  14. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

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  15. Oct-Lull

    Oct-Lull Active Member

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    I saw a list of counties in the southern part of the state on the CWD watch list. They said they are recommending not having mineral sites and other sites that may bunch deer in a small area. Anyone actually going to do this?
     
  16. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

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    cwd roundup and paying to play

    MONDAY, MAY 15, 2017

    TEXAS New CWD TSE PRION Case Discovered at Fifth Captive Deer Breeding Facility

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/05/texas-new-cwd-tse-prion-case-discovered.html

    SUNDAY, MAY 14, 2017

    85th Legislative Session 2017 AND THE TEXAS TWO STEP Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion, and paying to play, a lesson on how political and corporate science helps spread a deadly disease

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/05/85th-legislative-session-2017-and-texas.html

    THURSDAY, MAY 18, 2017

    Minnesota Four more farmed white-tailed deer test positive for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/05/minnesota-four-more-farmed-white-tailed.html

    MONDAY, MAY 15, 2017

    Pennsylvania 25 more deer test positive for CWD TSE PRION in the wild

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/05/pennsylvania-25-more-deer-test-positive.html

    WEDNESDAY, MAY 17, 2017

    CWD, TSE, PRION, Cattle, Pigs, Sheep, and Humans aka Mad Cow Disease

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/05/cwd-tse-prion-cattle-pigs-sheep-and.html

    WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 04, 2013

    Chronic Wasting Disease CWD and Land Value concerns?

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/12/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-and-land.html

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/


    Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
     
  17. Tim Hull

    Tim Hull PMA Member

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    Out in Utah where deer are like 1 per sq mile is some of the worst CWD outbreak. How do these deer get CWD when Mineral sites are non-existent along with pretty much non-existent baiting also. It isn't baiting or mineral sites. When you kill all the deer you are killing some that are resistant, therefore lengthening the time to get a resistant deer herd. It may take 100 years or longer, but let mother nature take its course.
     
  18. Tim Hull

    Tim Hull PMA Member

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    Spend the money on research, not mass killing. Just my opinion.
     
  19. Tim Hull

    Tim Hull PMA Member

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  20. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

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    ***at present, no cervid PrP allele conferring absolute resistance to prion infection has been identified.

    P-145 Estimating chronic wasting disease resistance in cervids using real time quaking- induced conversion

    Nicholas J Haley1, Rachel Rielinqer2, Kristen A Davenport3, W. David Walter4, Katherine I O'Rourke5, Gordon Mitchell6, Juergen A Richt2

    1 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Midwestern University, United States; 2Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, Kansas State University; 3Prion Research Center; Colorado State University; 4U.S. Geological Survey, Pennsylvania Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit; 5Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture; 6Canadian Food Inspection Agency, National and OlE Reference Laboratory for Scrapie and CWO

    In mammalian species, the susceptibility to prion diseases is affected, in part, by the sequence of the host's prion protein (PrP). In sheep, a gradation from scrapie susceptible to resistant has been established both in vivo and in vitro based on the amino acids present at PrP positions 136, 154, and 171, which has led to global breeding programs to reduce the prevalence of scrapie in domestic sheep. In cervids, resistance is commonly characterized as a delayed progression of chronic wasting disease (CWD); at present, no cervid PrP allele conferring absolute resistance to prion infection has been identified. To model the susceptibility of various naturally-occurring and hypothetical cervid PrP alleles in vitro, we compared the amplification rates and efficiency of various CWD isolates in recombinant PrPC using real time quaking-induced conversion. We hypothesized that amplification metrics of these isolates in cervid PrP substrates would correlate to in vivo susceptibility - allowing susceptibility prediction for alleles found at 10 frequency in nature, and that there would be an additive effect of multiple resistant codons in hypothetical alleles. Our studies demonstrate that in vitro amplification metrics predict in vivo susceptibility, and that alleles with multiple codons, each influencing resistance independently, do not necessarily contribute additively to resistance. Importantly, we found that the white-tailed deer 226K substrate exhibited the slowest amplification rate among those evaluated, suggesting that further investigation of this allele and its resistance in vivo are warranted to determine if absolute resistance to CWD is possible.

    ***at present, no cervid PrP allele conferring absolute resistance to prion infection has been identified.

    PRION 2016 CONFERENCE TOKYO

    http://prion2016.org/dl/newsletter_03.pdf

    WEDNESDAY, MAY 03, 2017

    *** First evidence of intracranial and peroral transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) into Cynomolgus macaques

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/05/first-evidence-of-intracranial-and.html


    kind regards, terry
     
  21. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

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