Field peas

Discussion in 'Dbltree's corner' started by dbltree, Sep 16, 2006.

  1. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    I sprayed my field peas with Select 2 EC grass herbicide the other day...same deal as with the clover. I used 10 ounces with 1% crop oil but less might have been enough. Rates vary depending on what kind of grass but I was only dealing with foxtail.

    2008 ND Weed Guide says 9-16 ounces for Select Max or 4-8 ounces for Clethodim for control of annual weeds and quackgrass.

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    Just remember to use crop oil and keep it agitated

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    Peas seem to be doing well and the oats are headed out so killing them with the Select isn't going to matter at this point.

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    Some had pods

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    but the foxtail was starting to worry me a bit

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    I'll check it a week or so and post results and I'll soon be planting a second patch that should flower during cooler weather that should yield more peas this fall.
     
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  3. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Re: Field peas - using Select herbicide

    I sprayed the field peas a few weeks ago with Select 2 EC and I missed a little strip which tells the whole story! /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/cool.gif

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    This is another spot I missed so you can see what a mess it would be if I hadn't used a grass herbicide.

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    I hit the spots I missed today to finish cleaning them up. Notice that since the oats were already heading out the stems are still standing for the peas to climb on.

    7-24 Field Peas and killed oats

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    Some pods have very tiny peas that haven't developed yet

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    Others are pretty well filled

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    Full pod

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    They look like...well...peas!! /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif

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    Many are grazed but nothing remotely like the soybeans which is what I was hoping.

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    Soybeans and field peas together make an interesting combo! If one uses Select to kill grasses and oats as a nurse crop, there is no reason why the two can't be grown together.

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    Since these peas were late spring planted the heat is preventing them from filling as well as they would if they flowered during cool weather. There will not be enough peas on these to provide a substantial fall attractant not to mention that the oats are now dead.

    Late July is the best time to plant for optimum fall yields as they will flower when it is cooler but that is too early for oats.

    These are roughly 10 weeks old so I think I will plant my second patch in mid August along with oats and rye. No matter what the peas do I will have a fall draw via the cereal grains.

    October 16th is our earliest average fall frost date here in SE Iowa so that puts me roughly inside thegrowing window. Flowering will be during cooler weather and regardless if they set many peas they will provide fall grazing.

    Peas are cold tolerant so a light frost shouldn't affect them much anyway.

    I do really like these because they don't seem to kill them when young like the soybeans, however without soybeans they may turn on the peas with a vengance..stay tuned! /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
     
  4. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Re: Field peas - summer planting

    So what is the difference between field peas and Austrian Winter Peas??

    Dang little! ;)







    The names are often inter-changed but it would suffice to say that field peas have been bred for dry pea production while AWP are used primarily for forage grazing or hay.

    In that respect perhaps it's like comparing soybeans bred for grain production and forage soys bred for grazing attributes.

    In either event I planted my FIELD PEAS this past week to see how a late summer planting of oats and peas will fare.

    The object of field peas of course is for deer to take advantage of the dried peas later in the fall. Peas are a cool weather crop so we want them to flower during cool fall weather.

    I tilled down a spring oat/pea plot and replanted at 100#'s of field peas per acre. I tilled down mature oats and added a sprinklng of new oat seed although I'm sure it wasn't needed.

    The spring peas were 3 months along and looked like this in late July...

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    Some had dried down

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    Some were still flowering

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    The oats were fully mature

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    by early August the patch started to get weedy and the hot temps started to wilt the peas

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    This is basically what I expected so I had saved a couple bags of Nannyslayers field peas to plant this summer.

    I didn't want to plant the oats to early so I waited till mid August and tilled the whole mess under...

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    The ground was dry and hard as a rock and didn't till worth a hoot and I was wishing I would haved disced it first.

    The straw and weeds didn't want to mix well in the dry hard soil

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    but eventually I got is stirred up enough to plant

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    Even with the heavy mulch on top the seed easily fell thru the straw to the soil below. I scraped the straw back to reveal the seed below...

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    I used my bag seeder to broadcast the seed (a small coffee can works well to move seed "bag to bag")

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    I also spread a few more oats and then ran the cultipacker over it. I took this close up for those that haven't used a cultipacker, showing how the ridge of the packer wheels support the weight and allows it to firm the soil around the seed rather then pack it soild.

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    I added about 8-10#'s of nannyslayers red clover seed

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    it's pre-inoculated

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    but always check the exp. date

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    and rolled it again...note the "ridges" rather then flat soil surface

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    It was a dusty job...

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    Rained a good 1/2" and more since planting so we'll see how the fall planting turns out.

    Will it flower and produce peas before cold weather?

    Will deer treat it differently now that the soybeans are gone and forage on the plant itself?

    Will mid August oats get to mature?

    Average first frost in my area is Oct 5th but some years it's Thanksgiving before it freezes, so who knows what Mother Nature has in store?

    Time will tell.... ;)
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2009
  5. huntyak

    huntyak Active Member

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    Re: Field peas - summer planting

    How much more beneficial is a cultipacker compared to a roller?
     
  6. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Re: Field peas - summer planting

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: huntyak</div><div class="ubbcode-body">How much more beneficial is a cultipacker compared to a roller? </div></div>

    HUGE!! /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/cool.gif

    There is a reason as noted in the pics above why a cultipacker is not a flat cylinder but a series of ridged concaved wheels.

    This shape allows you to just firm the soil over seeds rather then rolling it like a pancake... /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif

    A cultipacker crumbles clods and loose soil and leaves a beautiful firm growing surface for need seeds to emerge.

    Air is an enemy of seeds, so we want the soil firmly closed around the seeds. Look at a corn or bean planter, each row has a packer wheel to firm the soil over top of that row only. Loose soil inbetween the rows means it will take longer for weed seeds to emerge.

    Ever plant a garden? We used to put seeds in the "hoed row" (remember that old saying..."I didn't have a row to hoe" /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif )and then we lightly pressed the soil over top of the seeds with our feet...we didn't jump up and down and stomp the livin daylights out of the soil...see what I mean?

    Firm...not packed...that's what a cultipacker does...keep your eyes open for one at an auction sale someday! /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
     
  7. huntyak

    huntyak Active Member

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    Re: Field peas - summer planting

    I'll have to get one as my "roller" just has never worked well and truly PACKS it. So, i think tom I will use my 4 wheeler to pack it in. Anybody ever done that? Never done it but it has to be better than that giant of a roller I have.
     
  8. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Re: Field peas - summer planting

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">i think tom I will use my 4 wheeler to pack it in. Anybody ever done that? </div></div>

    Absoultely! I done it many may times in small plots...just keep moving over the width of the tires until you get it covered. Far better then a big heavy flat roller /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/cool.gif
     
  9. doublerack

    doublerack Active Member

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    Re: Field peas - summer planting

    We planted our peas with rye August 9th. I'm affraid we're going to have a weak thin crop as although we broadcast it fairly heavy, the tractor broke down so we couldn't cultipack it. Ended up using a cattle pannel as a drag. I'm affraid that with the lack of rain is going to hurt us.
    What I wouldn't give for a good 1.5" of rain this week!
     
  10. huntyak

    huntyak Active Member

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    Re: Field peas - summer planting

    So I planted Rye and clover yesterday but see no rain forecasted for the next 10 days. The rain we had the past few days made the soil great but now I am not sure if ANYTHING will grow without any rain. How drought resistant is rye and although it can be planted 1.5" inches deep, is shallower just as effective?
     
  11. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Re: Field peas - summer planting

    When I tilled down my standing crop or spring oats and field peas it was very dry and the soil was hard as a rock!!

    I wish now that I had disced it first to loosen it because my peas did not cover very well... /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/crazy.gif

    The cultipacker assured soil/seed contact but I'm going to need good rains to keep the pea seed from germinating and then dying. The seed is much better off covered at least an inch so that the tiny seed/roots don't dry out before they grow deep enough.

    I'll keep you posted on progress (thankfully we got a nice rain this morning and more is possible)

    You can see the sprouting peas here...

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    The straw mulch helps keep the soil from drying out

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    The oats were no problem at all and are sprouting very nicely thru the mulch

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    I added a few brassicas in some areas and they are also coming up very well so we'll just keep en eye on this plot and see how it does.

    Hopefully some of you that have been anxiously awaiting rain also got "wet" this morning... /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
     
  12. risto2351

    risto2351 Active Member

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    Re: Field peas - summer planting

    Dbl.
    Only a quarter of an inch here.
    My brassicas might not make it this year with no more rain in the forecast for awhile.

    As far as the cereal grains they should be alright but still need more rain.
     
  13. doublerack

    doublerack Active Member

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    Re: Field peas - summer planting

    .95" at our farm. Heading up tomorrow to see how everything is doing. My father in law said the Rye is coming in great but the Peas were about the same as Dbl's. Hopefully that good soaking helps out. I wish we could get about an inch one day a week until mid Oct.
     
  14. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Re: Field peas - Fall peas

    Even though I barely "knocked" down the spring oats, peas and weeds and the ground was dry and hard...everything came up fine!

    This pic shows oats, peas, red clover and brassicas coming up.

    [​IMG]

    I'm always "testing" something...so this is a mid August planting to see if the field peas will produce "peas" before cold weather or if they indeed need to be planted in July.

    I also wanted to test planting dates for oats (when is too early) so I have now have oats planted Aug 1st, Aug 15th and Sept 1st.

    I spread some left over brassica seed in some areas to test not only planting dates but the viability of mixing with other competitive crops.

    These pics are from mid to late September...

    FieldPeas 9-21-08

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    This shows the height of the oats and peas and you can see that 8-15 planted oats are getting "up there"...

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    The ground is covered with straw and previously I showed pics of the peas on top of the ground yet sprouting, so the straw/weed mulch did it's job and held moisture and keep the seeds alive.

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    At this point nothing is really "out competing" the other but the brassicas are small and for maximum forage should be planted weeks earlier.

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    The peas don't show up well but are roughly the same height as the oats and unlike this spring, deer are feeding heavily on the peas...go figure?

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    Regardless if they have time to produce "dry peas" the oat pea combo is a lush attractive food plot that is garnering plenty of attention... /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif

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    A close look shows the oats and peas have been "nipped" plenty. BTW...these are nannyslayers forage oats that matured and I re-tilled them under again... /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif

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    I put up an exclusion cage just to see what an ungrazed portion will look like.

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    Peas like cooler weather and after a beautiful September with temps right around 80 degrees it's finally cooling off into the 60's and 40's at night.

    Perfect for peas but deer may forage on them to heavily to allow them to set peas...time will tell, so I'll keep you posted. /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
     
  15. huntdoc

    huntdoc Member

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    Re: Field peas - Fall peas

    How different are Field peas from Austrian winter peas? Look very similar to me, could be the same for all I know! I can't deer to eat the AWP.
     
  16. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Re: Field peas - Fall peas

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: huntdoc</div><div class="ubbcode-body">How different are Field peas from Austrian winter peas? Look very similar to me, could be the same for all I know! I can't get deer to eat the AWP. </div></div>

    There isn't a whole lot of difference...

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Field Pea (Pisum sativum L.), a native of Southwest Asia, was among the first crops cultivated by man. Wild field pea can still be found in Afghanistan, Iran and Ethiopia

    Austrian Winter Pea (Pisum sativum spp arvense) is a fall-seeded pea introduced from Austria to the Pacific Northwest in the 1930s. </div></div>

    AWP's have been mostly used for forage while field peas are used for the harvest of dried peas. The object of the field peas is for deer to eat the dry peas late in the season rather then forage on the plant early on.

    Look at even a common garden pea however...they still look like peas!

    I wish I could find something they didn't like....until late fall, wouldn't that be sweet!

    The peas do fare better then soybeans early on and I will say that the AWP's I planted in the spring got mowed as they came up and the fieldpeas did not...something different there. /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
     
  17. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Re: Field peas - Fall peas - Mid October

    I checked the field peas a while back and it doesn't look to me like they will flower and make peas, in part because unlike this spring they are being grazed hard.

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    Either way the combination of oats and peas made for a lot of attractive forage!

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    It's hard to tell by this pic but the peas inside the cage were much higher and were climbing up the wire! I didn't put the cage up until mid September so it isn't a true reflection of possible growth.

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    I had tossed some brassica seed into some of it and you can see in this pic that is is also being grazed hard.

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    Remember this "pea patch" was planted in mid August even though ISU reccomends planting field peas in southern Iowa in late July.

    I wish I would have put up an exclusion cage at the start to see if intensive grazing prevented flowering...or time?

    This spring they scarecely touched them opting instead for the soybeans, but with the beans gone they quickly "adapted" to the new peas.

    In the end, pea pods or not, field peas certainly have a place in our food plot rotations. Considering the high cost of nitrogen and seed for other crops, field peas area lost cost alternative that can add nitrogen and provide a highly palatable food source comaparable to alfalfa.

    I used no fertilizer and no herbicides on this plot other then a small test area that I top dressed later. I would reccomend bringing P&K levels up and correcting PH levels before planting but we want to do that with any type of food plot.

    Field peas are sown at 100-120#'s per acre and oats at the same rate so your looking at $60-80 per acre for seed. Compare that to the cost of planting corn for instance which could easily run more then $200 an acre now days.

    It dropped down to 23-25 degrees Oct 28th so I'll be curious to see how well they tolerated the hard freeze and how long they are a viable draw.

    Broadcasting field rye into the peas in early September would insure season long use also.

    I'll check them in mid November and see what they look like then... /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
     
  18. doublerack

    doublerack Active Member

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    Re: Field peas - Fall peas - Mid October

    Our peas are covered with purpole blossoms right now.
    Still.. hard to tell if they are being browsed or not.
     
  19. 180class

    180class Well-Known Member

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    Re: Field peas - Fall peas - Mid October

    purpole huh? That's a strange color. /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif
     
  20. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Re: Field peas - Fall peas -Late November

    My summer seeded field peas did not fare so well as the spring peas, simply because deer started feedung heavily on them. I't odd that they barely touched them in the spring but in the summer/fall period they killed them?

    Go figure? /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/confused.gif

    They also could not stand the extreme cold as we have repeatedly had temps dropping to 12-14 degrees at night which did the peas in.

    My object however was not to have "forage" peas but rather dry "field" peas as one would have with dried down soybeans. The dried peas become very attractive to deer in late fall.

    No real "loser" here however because the oat/pea combo certainly was a major attraction all fall! /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/cool.gif

    They were planted 8-15-08 which is pretty early for fall oats and perhaps a month late for the peas, still they are hammering the forage oats from nannyslayer.

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    The peas however are now wilted and "kaput"... /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif

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    I had added a few brassicas to the mix and they have wiped them out as well.

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    One thing I noticed from my spring plantings with the peas side by side with the soybeans, is that they are very compatiable.

    There are herbicides that can be used on both, post emergence (such as Select grass herbicide)so that may be a possible test next year.

    Nannyslayer has a new seed line that includes a forage soybean and forage pea combo.

    Forage Soybean and Forage Pea

    Seems like there are endless possibles for me to "test"....dang the luck anyhow.... /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif
     
  21. SaskGuy

    SaskGuy Active Member

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    Re: Field peas - Fall peas -Late November

    I think you'd have been PLEASANTLY surprised how hard they hit them if they'd have had a chance to make peas and then mature.
     

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