Field peas

Discussion in 'Dbltree's corner' started by dbltree, Sep 16, 2006.

  1. nannyslayer

    nannyslayer New Member

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    There are plenty of things you can spray on a pea/bean mix.

    You can use Synchrony, which is a broadleaf killer that is comonly used in conventional beans, and if can remember right, pea's were on the label as well.

    Put it this way, I sprayed my beans last year with Synchrony, there just so happen to be some pea's in there with them, and they didn't die. :grin:

    http://www2.dupont.com/Production_Agriculture/en_US/label_msds_info/labels/H65609.pdf
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2009
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  3. nannyslayer

    nannyslayer New Member

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    Authority is also a great product, that you would spray before you plant the pea's or beans. It is one of the best products that I have found if you want to try a one pass program, and not come back with anything. Select may be needed to help control grasses later on, but broadleaves will probably be kept at bay.

    http://www.nufarm.ca/CA/Authority480?printView=true

    Sencor can be used as well on soybeans and pea's. This is another herbicide that is comonly used in conventional beans/peas.

    http://www.bayercropscience.ca/English/LabelMSDS/205/File.ashx

    Here is another that can be used on convetional beans preplant.

    http://www.valent.com/agriculture/products/valorxlt/index.cfm
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2009
  4. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Thanks for the great herbicide information Brian...looks like I need to update the herbicide thread...:way:

    I will say that I always include oats and that pretty much controls the weeds but pure planting of peas one would sure want some weed control...;)
     
  5. nannyslayer

    nannyslayer New Member

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    No problem. I would certainly recomend what you do if you are looking for a cheaper alternative. Oats really surpress weed pressure. But if someone is looking to do the bean and Pea mix, those herbicides are great, and your beans and peas are not competing with the oats for nutrients and moisture.
     
  6. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Could one also use Treflan pre-emergence? I believe that it is safe for both beans and peas if I read the label right and it's not very expensive.

    Treflan EC


     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2009
  7. nannyslayer

    nannyslayer New Member

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    I'm sure that one would not have any problems that way either.
     
  8. dangibbs1

    dangibbs1 Member

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    I'm ready for my weekly update on your peas Paul. My peas are about 2 weeks behind yours and am wondering where yours are at. I am out of state but my buddy did say they are out of the ground and looking good. Have the deer been staying off yours?
     
  9. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    I'll check em Tuesday and post pics...;)
     
  10. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    My peas have been in the ground nearly a month now and I found that some areas where deer are used to grazing, they are hammering the peas and oats pretty hard.

    I had to look close to even see the peas in this heavily grazed plot!

    [​IMG]

    They are hitting the peas and oats hard!

    [​IMG]

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    Other plots that were slightly off their usual "path of destruction" looked much better!

    [​IMG]

    The peas have put on pretty decent growth there

    [​IMG]

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    I will probaly overseed winter rye into all the pea stands to have lush new growth by hunting season because the oats will be too mature by then. Just like soybeans, the peas may or may not be allowed to mature and produce peas?

    That remains to be seen so I'm looking forward to pics from others who have plantings with less intensive grazing pressure....;)
     
  11. MBBobby

    MBBobby New Member

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    I am watching this thread as well for updates. I am planning to do some testing with them next year in Manitoba.
     
  12. nannyslayer

    nannyslayer New Member

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    If anyone is interested, I am going to be planting some Iron Clay pea's next year to see if I can get more yield for late season food with them. My dad has been planting them for years back home (southern MO) and they do have a very high yield potential.

    Here is a link where you can look at seeding rates, and optimum planting dates.
    http://www.wildlifeseeds.com/info/ironclay.html
     
  13. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Count me in Brian...I'll try anything once! :D

    I would just note here that IC peas aren't actually peas at all but "beans" and they do look much like a soybean but if they'll keep ahead of my deer I'm all for it!
     
  14. nannyslayer

    nannyslayer New Member

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    I guess I should have mentioned that as well. They are cow beans or known down south as "hay beans". :grin:
     
  15. tlambert

    tlambert PMA Member

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    We decided to try out some 4010 Field Peas in the sandy WI soil up by my dad's place. We threw 50lbs out in a spot a bit under a 1/2 acre that we had alongside and alfalfa test plot from last fall. We planted about 3 or 4 wks ago but they've been having very dry weather up there until the last week and a half. Pretty much zero moisture in July up there!
    Here's a pic of test plots for the peas and the alfalfa. My dad pulled a smooth one and had ryegrass in this area last fall....gonna have to spray it next spring cuz it keeps coming back. I told him to make sure he bought field rye...kids huh! I figure it'll give the peas something to climb as they're already latching on to it. You guys think that'll be alright or should it be killed?

    Here's the peas
    [​IMG]

    And the alfalfa...and grass. The alfalfa just came back to this stage in the last week and a half after some rain up there. It was completely ate/burned up and you couldn't find any out there.
    [​IMG]
     
  16. tlambert

    tlambert PMA Member

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    Notice the Oak "Split 3" killin tree in the background!
     
  17. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    The ryegrass is going to go to seed and continue to plague you so I suspect your going to want to kill it with clethodim while you can.

    The ryegrass will only suck up nutrients and moisture needed by the peas and alfalfa and serve no purpose this fall.

    That's my thoughts but not saying you will have a failure if you don't either...;)
     
  18. LoessHillsArcher

    LoessHillsArcher Well-Known Member

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    That tree is setup nicely Travis, trimmed and ready to rock it looks!
     
  19. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Updat on my early Jult planted field/forage peas that include both 4010 and 6040 peas.

    Some areas they have all but demolished them but some "off the beaten path" plots are holding their own!

    [​IMG]

    No flowering yet which is good because they will be more productive if they flower in cool weather during September.

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    A closeup reveals some grazing pressure that no doubt is holding back growth. Notice the pea tendrils wrapping around the oat leaves.

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    These peas are planted in strips in a tree planting and heavily fertilized and blessed with plenty of rain, so they lack nothing.

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    They are the closest I have gotten to having a decent crop of peas that will dry down and have peas for late fall attractant...

    [​IMG]

    Have a long ways to go yet so time will tell if the will indeed survive but they are hitting the brassicas hard and will have a new winter rye/oat/pea planting to forage on soon so perhaps they will indeed make it!

    One of the main plots got murdered and both peas and oats took a hit and the whole thing is a mass of foxtail that I'm going to kill with Clethodim 2-EC tomorrow. The foxtail is chest high so it is now protecting the peas somewhat so we'll see what happens after I spray.

    The oats are meant to provide a nurse crop for the peas and something for them to climb on but when deer mow the oats to the ground...it doesn't work so well...:rolleyes::D
     
  20. tlambert

    tlambert PMA Member

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    Hopefully our peas up in WI are looking that good after the rains....awesome plots dbltree
     
  21. Skully

    Skully PMA Member

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    Nice work Paul! I have logged into my notes to try the oats/peas in next years line-up!:way:
     

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