Field peas

Discussion in 'Dbltree's corner' started by dbltree, Sep 16, 2006.

  1. KSQ2

    KSQ2 PMA Member

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    Dbltree, would this work for me next year? Plant berseem clover as early as possible in the spring. Followed by oats/field peas/brassicas the first of Aug? I was thinking by planting later, I wouldn't have to overseed anything and the oats would still be a mid-season draw. Our first frost arrives annually around the 2nd of November. Would this allow enough time for the peas to mature?
    If this would work, it'd save us a ton of $$. I'd put on some potash and phosphorus each spring and let the rye and clover do their thing. I'd seriously consider doing this year after year in one of our 1.5 acre plots.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2011
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  3. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    KSQ2- I'm doing that same thing right now. I planted oats, Berseem & Crimson clover about 3 weeks ago. I'll keep in in great shape all summer & deer will have a nice treat and come to the location because there will almost always be food there from year to year AND all year long (not just in August) - Dbltree talked me into this and very smart, glad I listened! I did hit it heavy with P&K & pell-lime (400 lbs of each in my example).... By August I'll be able to disk it under, add some MORE Nitrogen and plant my turnips, radishes & winter rye. I know the clover will fix Nitrogen BUT I'll add a little for good measure (not as much as if I was planting on non-clover area) - the Phosphorous for turnips & radishes should be excellent already & PH great- N will be in great shape so they'll grow like crazy in my example with the turnips & radishes. Maybe do some Peas too in another location. you'll in great shape if weather cooperates, you fertilize properly and plant at obvious/appropriate time.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2011
  4. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Ok...here are the problems I have encountered planting "field peas" for dry pea production...

    1) Deer murder them just like little soybeans leaving nothing by hunting season

    2) Weed control is difficult unless you are prepared to purchase several herbicides compatible with peas.

    A far better, easier to work with combination is rye/oats/forage peas/forage radish/red clover planted in late August though early September.

    Zero weed problems, lush irresistible forage, deer cannot destroy it, the forage peas are like candy, the forage radishes do not compete with the cereals planted at this time, the red clover provides feed all the following summer.

    You may encounter different problems with field peas then I did but I can only make you aware of the potential for a frustrating and ineffective food plot....;)
     
  5. KSQ2

    KSQ2 PMA Member

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    Thanks for the info fellas! Dbltree, our growing season is quite different from yours. I'm in extreme SE Kansas. Last year we planted brassicas on the 15th of Aug. and they turned out incredible. Literally, two feet tall in most places and turnips the size of softballs; granted, the local gardeners said we had a banner fall for turnips with the right rainfall at the right times.
    With your advice, and keeping in mind the difference in growing season, how does this combination sound? Plant forage peas, winter rye, red clover, ground hog radishes, and purple tops the second week in Aug.? Is that too early for rye?
    One more thing, should I frost seed some more red clover into the plot the following spring?
     
  6. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Yes...wayyyy to early in your area, in your area mid September would be better probably but at least early September.

    I strongly advise against planting turnips with cereal grains, divide you plots and plant brassicas separately. The PTT's and cereals will compete with each other and one or the other will suffer.

    If you sow red clover with the fall rye combination you should not need to frost seed any additional seed..;)
     
  7. KSQ2

    KSQ2 PMA Member

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    Sounds good. Should I wait to plant the peas with the rye? Will that be too late for the peas?
    Also, the plot this year is in beans and corn (got 60 lbs. of free corn, so I thought I'd better us it), so I won't be able to do the red clover this fall. Should I wait and plant berseem next spring? Or, knock down the corn stalks and frost seed red clover late winter?
     
  8. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    I think you'll be happier planting peas with rye for forage and you can frost seed red clover into the corn stalks to get a jump on things in the spring...;)
     
  9. KSQ2

    KSQ2 PMA Member

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    Thanks Dbltree!:way:
     
  10. thwack13

    thwack13 New Member

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    After discing up about 3/4 acre of a 2 acre foodplot I have decided to go with a strip of rape/radish and the rest winter rye/winter peas. I am putting in the rape/radish 2moro and would like to do it all at once but is it too early for the rye and peas? Also how deep do the peas need to be planted, never messed with them before. Keep in mind I am just south of STL. Thanks
     
  11. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Yes...too early! Late August through early September is the right timing, planting now would allow the rye to get to tall and stemmy and unattractive to deer...;)
     
  12. MBBobby

    MBBobby New Member

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    There hasn't been a post on here for a year but I have a question specific to field peas.

    I was talking to another hunter that mentioned his neighbor just harvested a field of field peas a couple weeks ago, since then a volunteer crop has started and the deer are hammering it. Every post i've read in regards to food plots is that the peas will be devoured before the frosts kill the peas. Well this field is 160 acres in a low deer density area. So my question is how long will these field peas be attractive do the local whitetails? Anybody have experience with this?
     
  13. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    In that size field I suspect they will feed on them until snow covers them or severe freezes kill them but let us know what happens?
     
  14. mswaldo

    mswaldo Member

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    Austrian Winter Peas

    When is the best time to plant winter peas in NE Wisconsin? I was thinking about planting in the first or second week of August. Not sure if they can grow after first frost or why they are called winter peas.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    thanks
     

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