"FOOD" for thought??... CWD & Never eating venison again?!?!?

Discussion in 'Iowa Whitetail Conference' started by Sligh1, Jan 20, 2019.

  1. bluedog69

    bluedog69 Member

    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Yes I think that studies should continue.

    I doubt they test every single beef slaughtered. Ponder that undertaking for a second.

    Thirdly I once read(on the interesting LOL) that part of being kosher meat was that no bones were cut and only deboned meat used. May be hogwash May be true. It did make me ponder what is natural though.

    Eating a T bone that has been cut on a band saw(down the spinal column) probably would be more of a danger than a filleted loin that is boneless.

    There is also the evidence of humans getting it from eating squirrel brains. Where is the worry about eating squirrels?

    FOOD FOR THOUGHT.
     
  2. AdBot Guest Advertisement

  3. loneranger

    loneranger Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,007
    Likes Received:
    44
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Iowa
    One good reason to process your own and bone it out. !!!
     
  4. bluedog69

    bluedog69 Member

    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    8
    We had one deer processed about 35 years ago. Nasty! Didn’t eat any of it. Have done all every since.
     
  5. JNRBRONC

    JNRBRONC Moderator

    Messages:
    8,168
    Likes Received:
    289
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Feed lot Beef go to market around 18 months, too early to show symptoms. Maybe prion level is low? Older/“downer” cows are an issue.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  6. Kaleb

    Kaleb Active Member

    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    28
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    La Crosse, WI
    Are you sure this is accurate? I’ve read we’re CWD has been detected in deer 18months or less


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  7. JNRBRONC

    JNRBRONC Moderator

    Messages:
    8,168
    Likes Received:
    289
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Who tests beef?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  8. bluedog69

    bluedog69 Member

    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    8
  9. loneranger

    loneranger Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,007
    Likes Received:
    44
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Iowa
    Guys in trouble though. Fed protected
     
  10. bigbuckhunter88

    bigbuckhunter88 PMA Member

    Messages:
    2,798
    Likes Received:
    396
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    NE Iowa
    Doubt he will get in much trouble. Guy here shot one that came back as a wolf. Said he thought it was a coyote when he shot it. Got in 0 trouble
     
  11. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Bacliff, Texas
    watch these videos and that smell will just get worse.

    Norway is now banning hay and straw from countries with cwd.

    these videos you should all watch...just saying///

    Texas Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Symposium 2018 posted January 2019 VIDEO SET 18 CLIPS

    See Wisconsin update...terrible news, right after Texas updated map around 5 minute mark...



    update on Wisconsin from Tammy Ryan...



    Wyoming CWD Dr. Mary Wood

    ''first step is admitting you have a problem''

    ''Wyoming was behind the curve''

    wyoming has a problem...



    SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2019

    Texas Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Symposium 2018 posted January 2019 VIDEO SET 18 CLIPS

    https://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2019/01/texas-chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-tse.html


    kind regards, terry
     
  12. Kaleb

    Kaleb Active Member

    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    28
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    La Crosse, WI
    What are your thoughts on the question posed to you above ?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  13. 7mmsendero

    7mmsendero New Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Alger
    Great points have been made in this thread. Not to be a conspiracy theory guy, but I’m going ahead with being conspiracy theory guy.

    Mad cow has jumped the species barrier, but we carry on with eating beef. We believe CWD has not jumped (all we really have heard is the Canadian monkey research), but some are creating fear about venison. My mom heard something on the news about CWD infecting people and wanted all of us to stop eating venison. I ask what the heck’s going on?

    Are people just uneducated about this, or are they actively spreading stories to mess with hunters?

    I’m 100% on board with processing your own and not cutting bones. Also I’d recommend not eating organs.

    Maybe we need to research cougars, bears, wolves and coyotes out west. Those fools do it all wrong (eat organs first, break bones, even brains when they can), and they seem to be avoiding a species jump.
     
    Sligh1 and Muskrat24 like this.
  14. loneranger

    loneranger Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,007
    Likes Received:
    44
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Iowa
    Good points. If whitetails dwindle in the midwest sounds like Western hunts wont be much better.
     
  15. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Bacliff, Texas
    FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2019

    Mad cow testing in Alabama halted by government shutdown while mad deer disease CWD is spreading in the USA like wildfire

    A collaborative program between the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries and the U.S. Department of Agriculture to sample cows that die of unknown causes for bovine spongiform encephalopathy [BSE], also called mad cow disease, has been suspended since the federal government shutdown began in December.

    https://bovineprp.blogspot.com/2019/01/mad-cow-testing-in-alabama-halted-by.html



    kind regards, terry
     
  16. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Bacliff, Texas

    more food for thought...see;


    P132 Aged cattle brain displays Alzheimer’s-like pathology that can be propagated in a prionlike manner

    Ines Moreno-Gonzalez (1), George Edwards III (1), Rodrigo Morales (1), Claudia Duran-Aniotz (1), Mercedes Marquez (2), Marti Pumarola (2), Claudio Soto (1)

    snip...

    These results may contribute to uncover a previously unsuspected etiology surrounding some cases of sporadic AD. However, the early and controversial stage of the field of prion-like transmission in non-prion diseases added to the artificial nature of the animal models utilized for these studies, indicate that extrapolation of the results to humans should not be done without further experiments.

    P75 Determining transmissibility and proteome changes associated with abnormal bovine prionopathy

    Dudas S (1,2), Seuberlich T (3), Czub S (1,2)

    1. Canadian Food Inspection Agency, NCAD Lethbridge Laboratory, Canada 2. University of Calgary, Canada 3. University of Bern, Switzerland.

    In prion diseases, it is believed that altered protein conformation encodes for different pathogenic strains. Currently 3 different strains of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) are confirmed. Diagnostic tests for BSE are able to identify animals infected with all 3 strains, however, several diagnostic laboratories have reported samples with inconclusive results which are challenging to classify. It was suggested that these may be novel strains of BSE; to determine transmissibility, brain material from index cases were inoculated into cattle.

    In the first passage, cattle were intra-cranially challenged with brain homogenate from 2 Swiss animals with abnormal prionopathy. The challenged cattle incubated for 3 years and were euthanized with no clinical signs of neurologic disease. Animals were negative when tested on validated diagnostic tests but several research methods demonstrated changes in the prion conformation in these cattle, including density gradient centrifugation and immunohistochemistry. Currently, samples from the P1 animals are being tested for changes in protein levels using 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D DIGE) and mass spectrometry. It is anticipated that, if a prionopathy is present, this approach should identify pathways and targets to decipher the source of altered protein conformation. In addition, a second set of cattle have been challenged with brain material from the first passage. Ideally, these cattle will be given a sufficient incubation period to provide a definitive answer to the question of transmissibility.

    =====prion 2018===

    https://prion2018.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/program.pdf

    https://prion2018.org/

    ***however in 1 C-type challenged animal, Prion 2015 Poster Abstracts

    S67 PrPsc was not detected using rapid tests for BSE.

    ***Subsequent testing resulted in the detection of pathologic lesion in unusual brain location and PrPsc detection by PMCA only.

    *** IBNC Tauopathy or TSE Prion disease, it appears, no one is sure ***

    Posted by Terry S. Singeltary Sr. on 03 Jul 2015 at 16:53 GMT

    http://www.plosone.org/annotation/listThread.action?root=86610

    Discussion: The C, L and H type BSE cases in Canada exhibit molecular characteristics similar to those described for classical and atypical BSE cases from Europe and Japan.

    *** This supports the theory that the importation of BSE contaminated feedstuff is the source of C-type BSE in Canada.

    *** It also suggests a similar cause or source for atypical BSE in these countries. ***

    see page 176 of 201 pages...tss

    http://www.neuroprion.org/resources/pdf_docs/conferences/prion2009/prion2009_bookofabstracts.pdf

    *** Singeltary reply ; Molecular, Biochemical and Genetic Characteristics of BSE in Canada Singeltary reply;

    http://www.plosone.org/annotation/l...id=635CE9094E0EA15D5362B7D7B809448C?root=7143

    http://bovineprp.blogspot.com/2018/02/

    Wednesday, January 23, 2019

    CFIA SFCR Guidance on Specified risk material (SRM) came into force on January 15, 2019

    https://specifiedriskmaterial.blogspot.com/2019/01/cfia-sfcr-guidance-on-specified-risk.html


    kind regards, terry
     
  17. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Bacliff, Texas

    educate yourselves, and for sure, if you can, process your own meat, and be very careful doing it. here's an example with cattle, and please remember, science to date shows, cwd compared to bse, is much more transmissible vertically and horizontally, and there is some evidence that indeed, tse prion can be infectious i.e. casual contact, and with the recent/old findings of detectable tse prion in skin, with the right strain, transmission of the tse prion via casual contact is not so out of the question...imo, if it has not happened already...please understand, to date, there has been no documented cases of _familial_ type tse prion in any animal species, only human, which brings me to my deduction to date (which is meaningless), that the science surrounding human familial type prion disease is still questionable in my opinion, and evidently, i am not the only one that has questioned this;

    10. ZOONOTIC, ZOONOSIS, CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY

    TSE PRION AKA MAD DEER ELK DISEASE IN HUMANS, has it already happened, that should be the question...

    ''In particular the US data do not clearly exclude the possibility of human (sporadic or familial) TSE development due to consumption of venison. The Working Group thus recognizes a potential risk to consumers if a TSE would be present in European cervids.'' Scientific opinion on chronic wasting disease (II)

    EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ) Antonia Ricci Ana Allende Declan Bolton Marianne Chemaly Robert Davies Pablo Salvador Fernández Escámez ... See all authors

    First published: 17 January 2018 https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2018.5132 ;

    also, see;

    8. Even though human TSE‐exposure risk through consumption of game from European cervids can be assumed to be minor, if at all existing, no final conclusion can be drawn due to the overall lack of scientific data. In particular the US data do not clearly exclude the possibility of human (sporadic or familial) TSE development due to consumption of venison. The Working Group thus recognizes a potential risk to consumers if a TSE would be present in European cervids. It might be prudent considering appropriate measures to reduce such a risk, e.g. excluding tissues such as CNS and lymphoid tissues from the human food chain, which would greatly reduce any potential risk for consumers.. However, it is stressed that currently, no data regarding a risk of TSE infections from cervid products are available.

    snip...

    The tissue distribution of infectivity in CWD‐infected cervids is now known to extend beyond CNS and lymphoid tissues. While the removal of these specific tissues from the food chain would reduce human dietary exposure to infectivity, exclusion from the food chain of the whole carcass of any infected animal would be required to eliminate human dietary exposure.

    https://efsa.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.2903/j.efsa.2018.5132

    also see;

    This provides circumstantial evidence of an inherited susceptibility to the agent and suggests that cases of iatrogenic transmission may have occurred due to the unfortunate temporal proximity of susceptible individuals exposed to the agent.

    In the close geographic group of three cases possible nodes of transmission can be suggested, either iatrogenic or through dental procedures, but these must remain conjectural. It is known, however, that the similar scrapie agent can be transmitted from the gums of animals (Adams and Edgar, 1978). Such close spatial clustering of cases is extremely unusual, being previously reported in England (Matthews, 1975a), Czechoslovakia (Mayer et al., 1977) and Hungary (Majtenyi, 1978), but not detected in the study of the epidemiology of C.J.D. in urban Paris (Cathala et al., 1978) where the incidence was found to be relatively high.

    The occurrence of the disease in a patient who had contact with cases of familial C.J.D., but was not genetically related, has been described in Chile (Galvez et al., 1980) and in France (Brown et al., 1979b). In Chile the patient was related by marriage, but with no consanguinity, and had social contact with subsequently affected family members for 13 years before developing the disease. The contact case in France also married into a family in which C.J.D. was prevalent and had close contact with an affected member. In neither instance did the spouse of the non-familial case have the disease. The case described in this report was similarly related to affected family members and social contact had occurred for 20 years prior to developing C.J.D. If contact transmission had occurred, the minimum transmission period would be 11 years. Contact between sporadic cases has not been described and it is remarkable that possible contact transmissions have all been with familial cases. No method of transmission by casual social contact has been suggested.

    ***The occurrence of contact cases raises the possibility that transmission in families may be effected by an unusually virulent strain of the agent.

    snip...see full text here;

    http://web.archive.org/web/20050425210551/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m26/tab01.pdf

    The occurrence of the disease in a patient who had contact with cases of familial C.J.D., but was not genetically related, has been described in Chile (Galvez et al., 1980) and in France (Brown et al., 1979b). In Chile the patient was related by marriage, but with no consanguinity, and had social contact with subsequently affected family members for 13 years before developing the disease. The contact case in France also married into a family in which C.J.D. was prevalent and had close contact with an affected member. In neither instance did the spouse of the non-familial case have the disease. The case described in this report was similarly related to affected family members and social contact had occurred for 20 years prior to developing C.J.D. If contact transmission had occurred, the minimum transmission period would be 11 years. Contact between sporadic cases has not been described and it is remarkable that possible contact transmissions have all been with familial cases. No method of transmission by casual social contact has been suggested.

    ***The occurrence of contact cases raises the possibility that transmission in families may be effected by an unusually virulent strain of the agent.

    snip...see full text here;

    http://web.archive.org/web/20050425210551/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m26/tab01.pdf

    http://transmissiblespongiformencep...014/01/vpspr-sgss-sffi-tse-iatrogenic-by.html

    Wednesday, January 23, 2019

    CFIA SFCR Guidance on Specified risk material (SRM) came into force on January 15, 2019

    https://specifiedriskmaterial.blogspot.com/2019/01/cfia-sfcr-guidance-on-specified-risk.html


    kind regards, terry
     
  18. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,037
    Likes Received:
    1,643
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Central, IA
    Replied to TX CWD symposium but I’ll move that to the other thread....
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2019
  19. isu22andy

    isu22andy Active Member

    Messages:
    546
    Likes Received:
    118
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Damn someones good at copy and paste.
     
    deerhunter93 likes this.
  20. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Bacliff, Texas
    Wisconsin : Six White-Tailed Deer Fawns Test Positive for CWD

    Date: May 13, 2003 Source: Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

    Contacts: Julie Langenberg Wildlife Veterinarian 608-266-3143 Tom Hauge Director, Bureau of Wildlife Management 608-266-2193

    MADISON -- Six fawns in the area of south central Wisconsin where chronic wasting disease has been found in white-tailed deer have tested positive for the disease, according to Department of Natural Resources wildlife health officials. These are the youngest wild white-tailed deer detected with chronic wasting disease (CWD) to date.

    Approximately 4,200 fawns, defined as deer under 1 year of age, were sampled from the eradication zone over the last year. The majority of fawns sampled were between the ages of 5 to 9 months, though some were as young as 1 month. Two of the six fawns with CWD detected were 5 to 6 months old. All six of the positive fawns were taken from the core area of the CWD eradication zone where the highest numbers of positive deer have been identified.

    "This is the first intensive sampling for CWD in fawns anywhere," said Dr. Julie Langenberg, Department of Natural Resources wildlife veterinarian, "and we are trying to learn as much as we can from these data".

    "One noteworthy finding is simply the fact that we found positive fawns," Dr. Langenberg said. "These results do show us that CWD transmission can happen at a very young age in wild white-tailed deer populations. However, we found that the percentage of fawns infected with CWD is very low, in the area of 0.14 percent. If there was a higher rate of infection in fawns, then fawns dispersing in the spring could be much more worrisome for disease spread."

    Dr. Langenberg noted that while the youngest CWD-positive fawns had evidence of disease-causing prions only in lymph node tissue, several of the older CWD-positive fawns had evidence of CWD prions in both lymph node and brain tissues -- suggesting further progression of the disease.

    "Finding CWD prions in both lymph and brain tissues of deer this young is slightly surprising," said Langenberg, "and provides information that CWD infection and illness may progress more rapidly in a white-tailed deer than previously suspected. Published literature suggests that CWD doesn't cause illness in a deer until approximately 16 months of age. Our fawn data shows that a few wild white-tailed deer may become sick from CWD or may transmit the disease before they reach that age of 16 months."

    One of the positive fawns was shot with a doe that was also CWD positive. Information about these fawn cases combined with will help researchers who are studying the age and routes of CWD transmission in wild deer populations. "More data analysis and ongoing deer movement studies should give us an even better understanding of how this disease moves across the landscape", said Langenberg.

    "Thanks to eradication zone hunters who submitted deer of all ages for sampling, we have a valuable set of fawn data that is contributing to our state's and the nation's understanding about CWD," Langenberg said.

    http://www.cwd-info.org/index.php/fuseaction/news.detail/ID/a4b4e5e8749d729af242e253ac742084

    > > > Two of the six fawns with CWD detected were 5 to 6 months old. < < <

    Why doesn't the Wisconsin DNR want to routinely test fawns ?

    The DNR highly discourages the testing of any fawns regardless of where they were harvested. Of the more than 15,000 fawns from the CWD-MZ that have been tested, only 23 were test positive, and most of those were nearly one year old. It is exceedingly unlikely that a deer less than one year old would test positive for CWD, even in the higher CWD prevalence areas of southern Wisconsin. Few fawns will have been exposed to CWD, and because this disease spreads through the deer's body very slowly, it is very rare in a fawn that the disease has progressed to a level that is detectable. This means that testing a fawn provides almost no information valuable to understanding CWD in Wisconsin's deer herd and does not provide information of great value to the hunter in making a decision about venison consumption.

    http://dnr.wi.gov/org/land/wildlife/whealth/issues/cwd/no_testing.htm

    > > > It is exceedingly unlikely that a deer less than one year old would test positive for CWD < < < ???

    Chronic Wasting Disease in a Wisconsin White-Tailed Deer Farm

    and 15 of 22 fawns aged 6 to 9 months (68.2%) were positive.

    http://vdi.sagepub.com/content/20/5/698.full

    http://ddr.nal.usda.gov/bitstream/10113/21380/1/IND44108272.pdf

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/02/wisconsin-16-age-limit-on-testing-dead.html

    kind regards, terry
     
  21. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Bacliff, Texas
    that story was and still is BS. see what the doctors said.

    that being said, squirrels are just rodents, and i am not saying squirrels would not get a tse prion disease if fed enough mad cow protein of some type, hell, look what happened with the mad camel disease in dromedary camels, in algeria, but that is not what those doctors reported with the squirrel recently. ...

    Rochester Regional researchers: no clear link between squirrel brain consumption and death

    By BRETT DAHLBERG • OCT 19, 2018

    Rochester Regional Health cannot directly connect the reported death of a man with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to his consumption of squirrel brain, researchers said Friday.

    National and international media reports had indicated that the man’s squirrel consumption was linked to his development of the illness, which is similar in symptoms to mad cow disease.

    But Emil Lesho, a hospital epidemiologist at Rochester Regional Health, said that’s not the conclusion he and a team of researchers had drawn.

    The team presented research at a conference in San Francisco, after which LiveScience ran the initial story. That research did not show causation between squirrel brain consumption and the man’s disease, said Lesho. Instead, it showed an association.

    “This is just typical epidemiology,” Lesho said. “You look for anything that could indicate where a disease came from.”

    The research was not meant for public consumption, Lesho said. “Our original intent with this report was to present it in front of a jury of our peers at a scientific meeting, to become vetted.”

    It started, Lesho said, when he and other researchers noticed what looked like a series of cases where patients had symptoms resembling mad cow disease. Statistically, Lesho said, they should see that disease about once a year. But now they were seeing “what looked like two or three patients over a four-month period.”

    That would be concerning, because that family of diseases, caused by malformed proteins called prions, is very difficult to disinfect. Surgical equipment that comes in contact with patients who have prion diseases sometimes can’t be cleaned and need to be disposed of entirely.

    “We want to be very careful with this at our hospital,” Lesho said.

    In the end, further research showed that some suspected cases were not confirmed, and the frequency of the disease was actually in line with statistical expectations.

    Still, though, because prion diseases are transmissible through the consumption of an infected animal’s nerve cells, Lesho says the bottom line is, “be careful if you eat brain tissue.”

    http://www.wxxinews.org/post/roches...-between-squirrel-brain-consumption-and-death

    mad camel disease in dromedary camels, in algeria

    https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/24/6/17-2007_article



    kind regards, terry
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice