Land owner tags

Discussion in 'Legislative Forum' started by Fishbonker, Jan 16, 2019.

  1. flugge

    flugge Well-Known Member

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    quoted from 150 above
    You cannot be a tennant of a farm that you own (how would that be possible?). You can be one for a family member (your spouse).

    ^^This is how husband and wife hunting couples get so many tags I bet..Just a thought
     
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  3. Brett Morris

    Brett Morris PMA Member

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    I assumed it's an either/or situation. Landowner AND tenant can't both get a tag, correct?
     
  4. flugge

    flugge Well-Known Member

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    Nope. They can. I know a dad and son that get them as landowner/tenant


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  5. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    The only way that is possible is that they are registering different parcels and saying kiddo is a tenant on one of them. Likely fibbing and breaking law .
     
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  6. 150 Class

    150 Class Moderator

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    This is not correct (JMHO). A landowner can get a landowner tag, and so can the tenant. If the tenant happens to be the kiddo, said kiddo can get a landowner tag too (as the tenant). Same as the husband wife combos that have been mentioned.
     
  7. bigbuckhunter88

    bigbuckhunter88 PMA Member

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    Family owns some ground that is in a trust. It is in multiple parcels. My dad can get a tag as a landowner on one parcel, the parcel my younger brother farms for silage, cash rent, and rents the pasture for said cows and he can get a tag for that parcel and the tenant who cash rents the rest would be is available for the other parcel. The tag is only valid on the exact parcel registered for. That is straight out from a CO.
     
  8. 150 Class

    150 Class Moderator

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    This part is not how it works. As said already, if you qualify as a landowner or tenant, you can hunt all properties that you "qualify" for. It can be many, it does not need to be contiguous, and it can be in different counties. You register a property, one property, the first time you get a LOT. The next time you get a LOT, you do not register again.

    I do agree that there are restrictions as to how many LOT tags will be available for a parcel, but not how many parcels you can use your tag. There cannot be multiple LOTs, only one landowner and one tenant.
     
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  9. Tim Hull

    Tim Hull PMA Member

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    BUt not to both is stated several times in the legislation.
     
  10. Tim Hull

    Tim Hull PMA Member

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    It really only adds one season in my opinion. I already bow hunt, use landowner tag to cover both gun seasons and get a late season Muzzleloader tag. My wife gets an early season muzzleloader and I take her hunting for two weekends in October. So in my opinion, it is only allowing me to hunt early season muzzleloader on my own property. I did not fill my archery tag landowner or my late season muzzleloader on my property. Does anybody know if the IBA is supporting this change or opposing this change?
     
  11. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    This is mostly correct. The only difference is that your dad can register that piece and use the tag on any other piece he owns that he qualifies for. Along those same lines, on the parcel that is cash rented the farmer is eligible to register for the tag on that piece and hunt any other piece he is the operator on (so long as that is allowed with his owner agreements)
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2019
  12. arm

    arm Leg

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    "If your farm unit consists of multiple parcels, you do not need to list multiple parcels or submit multiple registration forms. Once you have successfully completed LOT Registration, you may obtain your LOT license(s) and hunt on all parcels of land within your farm unit, regardless of whether you own or rent them."

    Pretty clear that you can hunt all parcels

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  13. bigbuckhunter88

    bigbuckhunter88 PMA Member

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    So out of curiosity, was the CO correct in this situation since the other parcels are having someone claim a tag for them, or can he legally hunt all the parcels regardless of who gets tenant tags? Curious more than anything as it doesnt really effect the old man and where he hunts
     
  14. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Here are some scenarios ( copy and paste from DNR website):

    Joe is a landowner and his farm unit is greater than 2 acres and contains several parcels, some of which are spread over a multi-county area. Which parcel number should he register?
    A: Even though Joe has multiple parcels, he must register only once using a single parcel number to demonstrate his eligibility. Once registered, Joe may hunt with his LOT license(s) on any of the parcels he owns.

    George’s farm unit is greater than 2 acres and consists of both owned and rented land. Is he eligible for licenses both as a landowner AND a tenant?
    A: No, the farm unit is the basis for determining eligibility. George may register as either a landowner OR a tenant, but not both. In these situations, the DNR recommends that he register as a landowner because rented land can come and go. Once registered, George may use his licenses on all parcels within his farm unit, regardless of whether they are owned or rented.

    Mary and her two minor children returned to Mary’s parent’s home after a divorce. Mary and the kids help out around the farm. She does not pay rent, nor does she share in the profits from the farm.
    A: Does Mary qualify as a Tenant and her children as Tenant Child? No, nor does Mary qualify as a Landowner Child unless she is under the age of 18, or is 18-19 and enrolled in high school or a G.E.D. program.

    Grandma and Grandpa own land and have their minor grandchildren living with them...
    A: If they do not have guardianship of the children the grandchildren are not eligible as Landowner Child.

    Mr. Smith rents his farm to more than one tenant. Who is eligible for licenses?
    A: Tenants are only eligible for the parcels they rent and all of their hunting is restricted to the parcels they rent. As long as Mr. Smith meets one of the requirements as Landowner and does not rent his entire farm, he is eligible for Landowner licenses.

    Parents are divorced and live in different states...
    Child is under 18 and visits the parent who lives in Iowa who is an eligible Landowner. The child is eligible as a landowner child and has Iowa residency privileges. Foster children are also eligible.



    Issue: Selling Property
    Once the deed is signed, the buyer is considered the landowner and the seller is not eligible for landowner status. Although the sellers may retain the “Hunting Rights,” this does not entitle him or her to landowner licenses. These licenses are only available to eligible landowners or tenants by law.

    Issue: Qualifying Land
    Land must be used for agricultural purposes and gain or enrolled in a set aside program to be eligible for Landowner-Tenant licenses. A landowner with two or more acres who is not receiving financial gain from the land is not eligible for Landowner-Tenant licenses. Having a garden, mowing the lawn or planting landscaping trees does not qualify.

    Issue: Trusts and Receivers
    When a farm unit is in a trust with more than one receiver, all receivers are eligible to register as landowners on the farm unit. The receivers must share the reduced fee licenses. Their family members may register as spouse and child. All receivers and family members must register on the same parcel number.

    Issue: Limited Liability Corporations [LLC]
    All holders in the LLC may register as Landowners and their family may register as spouse and child. They must register on the same parcel number for the Farm Unit and share the reduced fee licenses. Nonresidents are not available for reduced fee Landowner-Tenant licenses. The partners must be operating the farm unit themselves.

    Issue: Living Estates
    A person who is the receiver of a living estate must be actively farming the land to be eligible for Tenant status. Simply being the receiver and living in the house, but not farming the land, does not qualify.

    Issue: Child Status
    The child of the Landowner or Tenant must be less than 18 years old, or may be 18 or 19 years old, if still in high school or participating in a general equivalency degree [GED] program. If a child is 17 when they register and turns 18 before season, they are eligible to hunt under Child status. Child status ceases when the child turns 19 and is not in high school or enrolled in a GED program.
     
  15. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    yes he can. Posted this above, but that scenarios is this one:

    George’s farm unit is greater than 2 acres and consists of both owned and rented land. Is he eligible for licenses both as a landowner AND a tenant?
    A: No, the farm unit is the basis for determining eligibility. George may register as either a landowner OR a tenant, but not both. In these situations, the DNR recommends that he register as a landowner because rented land can come and go. Once registered, George may use his licenses on all parcels within his farm unit, regardless of whether they are owned or rented.
     
  16. Fishbonker

    Fishbonker Life Member

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    Passed subcommittee this AM. Will be in full committee.

    EDIT: The only comment was from the IBA, we wanted the language cleaned up to be sure LOTs are not used by any adults in youth seasons. We think that language will be added.
     
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  17. bigbuckhunter88

    bigbuckhunter88 PMA Member

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    Thanks for the update and glad the IBA gave that input
     
  18. Fishbonker

    Fishbonker Life Member

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    Passed subcommittee today 12-0 with 1 absent. Will be eligible for Senate debate.
     
  19. bigbuckhunter88

    bigbuckhunter88 PMA Member

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    Interesting that this gets full support on here, but when they propose basically the same thing for all residents that gets shot down like it's the worst idea ever. Personally I think it is a bad idea for everyone. Cant have empty tags or failure anymore. Maybe they should give us participation trophies when we buy our licenses just in case we cant fill a tag in 3 months we have to do it. Next it will be all one continuous season allowing rifles and you can hunt til you get your 3 bucks.
     
  20. Fishbonker

    Fishbonker Life Member

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  21. mplane72

    mplane72 Active Member

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    I had that thought as well. I have to problem admitting I am philosophically apposed to LOT's not necessarily the reduced price but the fact that they're an extra tag that allows a land owner to have more then any other resident. Seems pretty European to me. Definitely hard to square with the North American Management Model. That being said a land owner hunting just on their land doesn't really effect me. Not like they're going to let me or mostlikely anyone else on if they don't have a tag for a season.
    As to the other Bill I'm trying to figure out what's behind it. I wouldn't necessarily mind getting one buck tag a year and be able to fill it in whatever season I like.
     

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