Shooting older vs. younger does???

Discussion in 'Whitetail Management' started by Kat, Apr 4, 2004.

  1. Kat

    Kat Guest

    I’m curious about this. I hear a lot of people say to shoot the older does. I was wondering about this as the older does are usually the ones who have the big healthy fawns who live through the winter. They are also more likely to have twins or triplets than a younger doe, from my observation. And they also have more experience at raising fawns, so the fawns have an advantage there. I always look for a younger doe to shoot, like a year and a half old. They are a bit more tender too. So, am I missing something? What is the advantage of shooting older does? [​IMG]
     
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  3. Shredder

    Shredder Life Member

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    1.Some of the older does in the area are non producers of fawns making them essentially useless to your herd

    2.They are nearly as smart as an old buck, thus education to the fawns to be extreemly wary as they mature

    3.Older does tend to push out some of the younger bucks even if they are not their offspring

    4. Like you mentioned with the number of offspring produced, if you are looking to decrease the herd size, taking out an older doe will decrease the number of fawns in the area the next spring vs a young doe producing one healthier fawn or two

    5. overall reduction on the population by removal of the doe and potential little ones reduces the incidence of disease and parasites leading to a healthier herd the following season

    In my opinion, if you intend to impact the herd in that sense, a significant number of does need to be removed every couple of years or 3-4 adult does yearly
     
  4. Kat

    Kat Guest

    Thanks Shredder. That does make sense. I just never heard the reasons for it. Where I hunt overpopulation isn't a problem yet, in fact I was usually wanting there to be MORE deer. I'm pretty happy with the level it's at now, so I will keep your advise in mind for it to stay that way. [​IMG]
     
  5. Liv4Rut

    Liv4Rut Active Member

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    good points shredder, and good question. sometimes i feel that harvesting a mature doe, that has survived many hunting seasons, is sometimes alot harder than a buck. i bet over the years, that 85 percent of the time ive been caught in a stare down or had gotten winded it was from a big ole doe, they sure can be a hunters best friend yet, on the same side be their worst enemy in many ways [​IMG]
     
  6. Scott

    Scott Active Member

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    From a genetic standpoint, you should shoot the old does. They do this in most of the big ranches down south to encourage a healthier, gentically stronger herd. Every generation of fawns is gentically better than the previous generation. If a new fawn is born and survives to a breeding age, there is some reason that the fawn had a advantage. It doesnt matter whether it is a buck or doe. Why do you think they shoot the mature eight points off the big ranches. They are trying to promote better genetics and to essentially modify the evolution of the herd. Whether it be larger body size or less suceptibility to disease, deer just like anyother animal evolve to meet their environment. It may not be something that is noticeable to the human eye, but from a genetic standpoint, I believe that a younger doe is superior to an older one. I thought a scientific insight might help anwser your question.
     
  7. alaskanwhtail

    alaskanwhtail New Member

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    Keep it a balenced herd, shoot slob does.. [​IMG]
     
  8. Kat

    Kat Guest

    Shoot slob does, LOL. Ive never seen a slob doe, but a few years ago I had a young doe come by my creek bottom stand almost every night I was there. She was the deer equivalent of a supermodel, so I named her The Supermodel Doe. She was, aesthetically speaking, the most beautiful doe I have ever seen. She was completely safe from me, as I could never bring myself to shoot her. She even walked more dainty than the other does. She had one fawn, a little female that was just as pretty as her. They were always alone, the other does must have hated her I never saw her after that year. Either someone shot her, she let herself go (too much TV. and ice cream), or she picked up a modeling contract in New York.

    Anyway, thanks for the informative replies! [​IMG]
     
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