Steak Diane - Tenderloin or loin

Discussion in 'Food Corner' started by Jmac0501, Jul 10, 2018.

  1. Jmac0501

    Jmac0501 PMA Member

    Messages:
    99
    Likes Received:
    125
    Trophy Points:
    33
    Location:
    Central Iowa
    Per Muddy's suggestion, starting a new thread for a recipe. May be a little easier to find this way.
    Made Steak Diane last night. One of the kids and wife's favorites.
    Last night i used tenderloins, buy I do this with loin portions as well and cut them in half lengthwise to make the pieces a bit easier to cook.

    I always slice the meat after resting, then throw it back in the sauce to cook just a bit more. I also double the sauce recipe as there never seems to be enough of it.

    I need to give credit too. This a Hank Shaw's recipe. He's got a great cookbook called Buck, Buck, Moose(as well as Duck Duck Goose for any waterfowlers.


    Ingredients
    1/2 pound piece of venison backstrap or tenderloin
    Salt
    2 tablespoons unsalted butter
    1 shallot, minced
    3 cloves garlic, minced
    1/4 cup brandy
    1/2 cup venison stock or beef broth
    2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
    1 tablespoon mustard(dijon or brown. NOT yellow)
    1 tablespoon tomato paste
    1/4 cup heavy cream
    Minced herbs for garnish (basil parsley, chives, etc)
    Instructions
    Bring the venison loin out of the fridge, salt it well and let it come to room temperature, at least 20 minutes.

    Heat the butter in a large saute pan over medium-high heat for about 90 seconds. Pat the venison dry with a paper towel and cook it on all sides. Turn the heat to medium so the butter doesn't scorch, and take your time. It should take about 8 to 10 minutes or so to get a nice brown crust on the venison without overcooking the center. Remove the venison, tent loosely with foil and set aside.

    Add the shallots to the saute pan and cook for 1 minute, then add the garlic and cook for another 30 seconds or so. Don't let the garlic burn. Deglaze the pan with the brandy, scraping off any stuck-on bits in the pan with a wooden spoon. Let the brandy cook down almost to a glaze, then add the venison stock, tomato paste, mustard and Worcestershire sauce and stir to combine. Let this boil down until a wooden spoon dragged across the pan leaves a trail behind it that does not fill in for a second or two. This should take about 3 minutes on high heat.

    Turn off the heat and let the boiling subside. Stir in cream until the sauce is as light as you like. Don't let the sauce boil again or it could break.

    Slice the venison into thick medallions. If you find you have not cooked it enough, let the meat swim in the sauce for a few moments to heat through. If the venison is to your liking, pour some sauce on a plate and top with the meat. Garnish with some chopped herbs. Chives are traditional, but basil and parsley are also nice.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
    fatboy, muddy and HorseDoctor like this.
  2. AdBot Guest Advertisement

  3. muddy

    muddy Administrator

    Messages:
    15,547
    Likes Received:
    1,020
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    20 feet up
    Wasn't meant towards you specifically. I love the thread but it's hard to keep track of everything. Looks good.
     
  4. Jmac0501

    Jmac0501 PMA Member

    Messages:
    99
    Likes Received:
    125
    Trophy Points:
    33
    Location:
    Central Iowa
    No worries. Separate recipes should make them a little easier to find. It was a good suggestion.
     
  5. muddy

    muddy Administrator

    Messages:
    15,547
    Likes Received:
    1,020
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    20 feet up
    That's why I get paid the big bucks.
     
  6. Ishi

    Ishi PMA Member

    Messages:
    1,745
    Likes Received:
    835
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Mill Creek
    Awesome cook!! Definitely on my to do list:) One thing though I’ll have to do this on my pellet grill.
    The more food threads the better.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice