Switchgrass

Discussion in 'Dbltree's corner' started by dbltree, Jan 29, 2006.

  1. Rit

    Rit New Member

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    5F5FD015-27B1-4546-ACCC-31DA132CE86C.jpeg 0095D06D-727D-48D3-93A5-82B24E9C44BB.jpeg
    Thanks for the replys fellas. Here a few photos for reference. These matted down areas are almost 100% Foxtail. I have some Kanlow seed already that I would still like to broadcast in. I guess for me the issue with timing any spraying in the Spring if I seed again is having established switch green up before the new seed germinates. I thought I read that Quincloric would damage new plantings. I might have remembered that wrong. I am probably overthinking this way too much. Thanks again for the advice.
     
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  3. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have zero fear of burning first year switch. Done it many times without issue. The other natives, BB, IG, are a different story. Probably what I would do with above.
     
  4. arm

    arm Leg

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    Speaking of. How narrow of fire break can a guy do? Is 12' ok? (2 rounds with mower). I've read 10 yards I think

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  5. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    You can do it with a foot of done properly on a low wind day. Back burn it into the wind. Once you have a break this way you can start a head fire at other end.

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  6. LoessHillsArcher

    LoessHillsArcher Well-Known Member

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    Snapped a couple pics of our first year CIR switch, drilled mid Nov 2017. Came in great! Mowed one time in early July. Lots of foxtail mixed in there too yet but that’s ok

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  7. Jbohn

    Jbohn Active Member

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    I have burned first year also no issues..
     
  8. Pheasant6290

    Pheasant6290 New Member

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    Here’s my experience with switch for past 12 years.

    I see many posts about switch to thick for deer.

    Deer do like it better if they can move through the switch easily in my opinion. I have 3 stands side by side totaling about 25 acres. When planting we ran out of seed on one side of planter without knowing. Big voids in the last stand now for about 10 years, the voids are full of fox tail that lays down at first snow and easy to move through when standing. Favorite stand for deer by far to bed up in and hang out. Most deer by far always in this stand for past 7-8 years.
    My other stands where thick & very hard to walk thru and had less deer , I took a sprayer behind my 4 wheeler last spring and burnt in with glyphosate about 3 foot wondering paths not knowing how it would turn out & scared I was making them to wide. The tall switch on the edge of the paths now bends over into the paths, you can barely see there are paths in the switch. I got deer everywhere in these stands with beaten down trails everywhere I burnt in a path. I will be burning in more this coming spring it worked so well.
    Fields were 10lbs an acre of CIR

    Quinclorac My experience.
    I have a new stand of switch I planted last year that had a bad foxtail problem. I sprayed with quinclorac that did great where I hit with one spray. No foxtail. I hit about a half acre with 2 to 3 sprays where the foxtail was a little thicker and it killed all the switch also.
    Be careful with that stuff.
    I hit another section of bad foxtail about every 3 -4 weeks with quinclorac and the new switch was fine.
    8 Lbs Dacotah

    BB & Indian grass
    I have 12 year old indian , big blue , and Canadian wild rye that I will be pulling out this spring and doing 100% switch. BB & Indian are already laying flat for the winter like every winter if you get even one wet snow or some ice. Wild rye disappeared 5-6 years ago.
    Theres some sparse switch that’s the only thing left standing every winter.

    Planted some switch no till last February into heavey corn fodder. Crap. Switch very spotty. Never again. Only came up in the cleaner areas without fodder.

    Planted 3 acres switch no til in February and then planted soybean over top my switch by mistake. I sprayed light 2-4d when beans got going killing sbout 80% of the beans. The spotty bean canopy seem to be making the switch stand a perfect thickness. Will see what it does next year.

    Anyone ever plant switch with corn ?

    Thanks. Good luck.
     
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  9. LoessHillsArcher

    LoessHillsArcher Well-Known Member

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    I agree - weedy switch is almost better than thick 100% pure switch
     
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  10. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    never did corn & switch. Corn is too tall and imo- would canopy & choke out the little switch plants as they sprout up mid summer. Some might survive but I wouldn’t recommend it.

    All above is great feedback! Trial & error part of it too.
     
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