Timber Stand Improvment

Discussion in 'Dbltree's corner' started by dbltree, Oct 1, 2008.

  1. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    5,991
    Likes Received:
    1,566
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Central, IA


    Appreciation of big white oak upland timber. I only go in 1-2 times a year & it’s kinda like being on a mountain peak for me- just pure appreciation & enjoyment of this awesome forest that is fairly rare in Iowa. Wish every drop of upland could look like this. Literally THOUSANDS of 25-35”+ white oaks- it’s amazing. Working to have my junkier stuff be like this some day. This stand does need work though too.
     
    cybball likes this.
  2. AdBot Guest Advertisement

  3. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,910
    Likes Received:
    828
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    SC Iowa
    Starting him early. Little slow on specie identification but he'll get there. ;)[​IMG]

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
     
    Sligh1, EatSleepHunt, goatman and 3 others like this.
  4. Daver

    Daver PMA Member

    Messages:
    5,552
    Likes Received:
    780
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Iowa City
    Not Skip :). But I have run fire through parts of my timber more than once, with good success and results. I have NOT though tried it in areas where I have done a lot of hinge cutting, as I don't want to burn up all of the horizontal residue from the hinging activity. If you wait for the right conditions, fire is easily managed in a timber setting...but here are a couple of key "to-do's" in advance...

    I walk through the area to be burned and use a leaf blower to create a little, even just 6"-12" will do it, bare earth barrier around certain trees. A timber fire will normally burn low to the ground and relatively cool as compared to a grass fed fire. It will not be as prone to "jumping" a fire break and/or catching everything in its' path on fire as will a grass fueled fire. So it is fairly easily controlled by just a small "earth" barrier/fire break.

    I will look for larger, dead trees and blow the leaves away from the base so as not to catch those on fire. A large, dead tree that does catch, and a lot of them are hollow, will burn for a long time, even days, as the hollow zone will function as a "chimney". Even though I may be OK with a certain dead tree burning...I do not feel comfortable with a fire that could burn LONG after I have left the scene. Plus, I like to leave the ol' dead hollows for dens, etc, for other wildlife to use.

    Where I have created brush piles in the timber for rabbits, turkey nesting, etc, I will also use the leaf blower and make a barrier/fire break around them.

    I have used a leaf blower, and also a riding lawn mower at times, to create a bare earth barrier where I want the fire to originate in the timber. Two passes, about 90" width, of barrier on the upwind side is God's plenty for a low, slow burning fire. That relatively narrow band could also be sufficient on the downwind side, but I normally play it safe and double that width OR I will let the wind carry the fire to a place that I have already burned, etc, so no real fire break is needed. I have also used a disk or tiller to create a bare earth barrier on the extreme edge of the timber, to let it burn all the way through the timber and then terminate at the field edge.

    I also burn according to the wind direction and will always begin with a downwind backing fire and let it creep into the wind for a bit...then go to the upwind section and light it up and let it go downwind to meet the previously lit backfire.

    A backpack leaf blower is awesome in these cases, a backpack sprayer is also a good tool to have handy if you have more than one person doing this. Right or wrong, I have burned many times by myself without incident. The key is the prep.

    Watch those hollow trees, that is where the problems can come in though. Don't let those get on fire and it is otherwise pretty easy.
     
    SB3 and Sligh1 like this.
  5. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,910
    Likes Received:
    828
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    SC Iowa
    Timing is huge on timber fires
    Dormant season vs growing season. Grant woods has several good videos on timber burns with lots of explanation. Check out his website


    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
     
  6. EatSleepHunt

    EatSleepHunt Active Member

    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    72
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Here's my little one last year, 3 years old. Him and his brothers came to visit me in the timber. I'm showing the other two what I'm doing Turn Around and this is the picture I get he's ready to go.
    2 ft of snow is finally gone. ( All in 2 days!)
    Ready to go catch up on some TSI[​IMG]

    Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
     
    cybball, Daver and Sligh1 like this.
  7. deep woods goat hunter

    deep woods goat hunter PMA Member

    Messages:
    390
    Likes Received:
    265
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    North Missouri
    This is an area I had the marketable pallet lumber cut out of last winter. It was consumed with hickory. A buddy and I grabbed the saws and wacked out about an acre and a half last night. Freed up the oaks and even a few walnuts that were along the little ditch. I have a lot more to do but a good start. I have run really short on time this year.
     
    cybball likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice