Updated 2020 new pond thread

Discussion in 'Iowa Whitetail Conference' started by Nrharris, Jan 18, 2020.

Tags: Add Tags
  1. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,814
    Likes Received:
    1,722
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    SC Iowa
    So I recently purchased a farm with a pretty nice pond on it. There is an aerator hooked to some floating barrels. Its all powered by a windmill. I watched it for a little while the other day and the slightest breeze gets it going and makes bubbles. Pretty neat setup. I'll have to snap some pics.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
     
    Daver and MO-APE like this.
  2. AdBot Guest Advertisement

  3. Daver

    Daver PMA Member

    Messages:
    6,097
    Likes Received:
    1,352
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Iowa City
    FWIW...the most vulnerable time of the year for a pond is normally late July/early August. It is then that the water temps are highest and there are lower DO counts. At that time...even a day or two of no wind can tilt the pond to the place where major fish kills are possible due to low oxygen. Therein lies the rub with the otherwise helpful wind based aerators. Just when you need it most, a hot, overnight in late July combined with no wind, and therefore no supplemental aeration, and whammo...the pond is 2/3 dead fish overnight.

    It is predominantly for this reason that guys got away from wind powered aerators...they are great for 95% of the year, but are useless just when most needed. I offer this just info as a FYI so you know that you are not fully protected with that style of aeration.
     
  4. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,814
    Likes Received:
    1,722
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    SC Iowa
    I'm far from an expert on this subject. I can just say from what I observed it took next to nothing as far as a breeze to make bubbles. There are some BIG fish in this pond so I guess it's working so far. Previous owner installed it after a fish kill like you described.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
     
  5. Nrharris

    Nrharris Active Member

    Messages:
    171
    Likes Received:
    175
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Benton County Iowa
    It is a long ways off the road so power probably isnt happening. Dad has talked about building a small cabin out there and using a propane generator for power there. Hoping its deep enough to alleviate some of the fish kill problems. Also hoping we have enough water in it this fall to put a bunch of fathead minnows in it. Then there will be plenty of forage for spring stocked fish. Also that is one long dam. How deep is your pond going to be?
     
  6. MO-APE

    MO-APE Member

    Messages:
    394
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    NoMo
    20’ deep
     
    Nrharris likes this.
  7. Rous14

    Rous14 Member

    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Michigan
    Question for u Daver. The aerator in my pond quit working due to a raccoon issue about 3 weeks ago maybe a month ago. It’s fixed and ready to work but I was told to wait to start it back up until this fall. The explanation was something along the lines of turning it on now could potentially over heat the pond. Cool water is down low and turning it on could mix too much of the warmer water into it (i may not have that perfectly but something along those lines). Fwiw my pond is roughly 2 to 2 1/2 acres, averages probably 6-9’ w one end being close to 15’ deep approx. and there 3 diffusers evenly spread from one end of the pond to the other (it’s long and fairly narrow).
    Would u agree w the advice I’m getting?
     
  8. Daver

    Daver PMA Member

    Messages:
    6,097
    Likes Received:
    1,352
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Iowa City
    Disclaimer...I am not sure about this. :) But my lean would be to trust that advice. I do know that people in the know on aeration do warn about how and when to start aeration. Now then, ponds naturally "turnover" about this time of the year...perhaps the advisor was warning against "jump starting" that process??

    I would recommend checking out the Pond Boss website, there are many knowledgeable posters there that can speak from a better perspective than I can.
     
  9. Rous14

    Rous14 Member

    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Michigan
    Yea I think your lean is along same lines of what my thoughts are and what I was given as advice. But I’ll definitley check out the website u referenced. Appreciate it!
     
  10. Nrharris

    Nrharris Active Member

    Messages:
    171
    Likes Received:
    175
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Benton County Iowa
    Starting to get some water. Resized_20200815_093606.jpeg
     
  11. 203ntyp

    203ntyp PMA Member

    Messages:
    1,745
    Likes Received:
    548
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    PA
    Looking good!
     
    Nrharris likes this.
  12. Nrharris

    Nrharris Active Member

    Messages:
    171
    Likes Received:
    175
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Benton County Iowa
    Finally got some rain. Water level is coming along nicely. The project manager said if you filled it a gallon per minute, it would take 26 years to fill it. Resized_20200918_182103(1).jpeg
     
  13. mrush

    mrush Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Illinois
    What prevents seepage along the drawdown pipe? I assume this is buried below the dam?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  14. Nrharris

    Nrharris Active Member

    Messages:
    171
    Likes Received:
    175
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Benton County Iowa
    They packed all over and around the drawdown pipe. They had to do density tests all around it to make sure it was packed right.
     
  15. Daver

    Daver PMA Member

    Messages:
    6,097
    Likes Received:
    1,352
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Iowa City
    It is also common for drawdown pipes to have a collar on them to prevent seepage along the outside of the pipe. I don't know if that was used in this case or not, but I would guess that they probably did.
     
  16. mrush

    mrush Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Illinois
    I’m familiar with anti seep collars and have been studying Dam Construction for a while now, I have not run across a drawdown pipe below the Dam before, that’s the highest pressure point in the dam. I have a project coming up that this would work perfect for but I didn’t think it was possible.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  17. Nrharris

    Nrharris Active Member

    Messages:
    171
    Likes Received:
    175
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Benton County Iowa
    The dam construction specs had the approval of the army Corp of engineers so it must work. To my knowledge all of the other ponds in the area that are getting built have a drawdown pipe as well.
     
  18. arm

    arm Leg

    Messages:
    1,199
    Likes Received:
    291
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    south central iowa
    Mine does as well

    Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice