Your thoughts...

Discussion in 'Shed Hunting Conference' started by Blackfoot, Mar 16, 2003.

  1. Blackfoot

    Blackfoot New Member

    Messages:
    213
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Iowa
    While shed hunting the other morning, I stumbled upon a year old antler that’s browtine was completely chewed away an fragments of the G-2, G-3, and the remaining main beam had been gnawed off. My question is: how long , on average, does it take for rodent(s) to completely dissolve of an antelr? My brother and I got into a long debate over the whole situation, because we seem to have very different opinions on the subject… any comments/opinions of you own are greatly appreciated – Thanks!
     
  2. AdBot Guest Advertisement

  3. Shredder

    Shredder Life Member

    Messages:
    5,719
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    Midwest
    I think a lot of that depends on where the shed was dropped. Two examples, a buddy of mine picked up a 4 inch Circ base that had been dropped early, Not known how big the deer was because the majority of the shed had been chewed away. He showed me the base and it is definitly a buck from this year. Another buddy of mine was walking a CR field and found an antler that had been there quite awhile, at least a year and there was not a chew mark on it so go figure. I would say based on these two examples, one dropped in a field where squirrels don't wander much are a lot safer than the ones dropped in the woods. Based on my limited shed collection and where I have found them, it rings true for what I have. Hope that helps in your discussion.........S220
     
  4. Bobcat

    Bobcat Guest

    Last March I found a dandy 4 point shed that was from the year before. I found it in a grassy area in a cedar thicket and the weeds had completely grown over it except for the antler tips, and it didn't have a chew mark on it. Thirty minutes later I found a fresh drop (it still had moist membrane around the pedicle), and the mice had already chewed the tips from the tines! I guess it just depends where they are dropped. Just my 2 cents.
     
  5. Blackfoot

    Blackfoot New Member

    Messages:
    213
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Iowa
    thanks guys for your replies... Location as to where the antler was dropped and the number of rodents in the area are definetly key factors as to how long the antler will go untouched... in many midwestern states, the rodents can be very abundant in certain locations and dissolve an antler in no time, but places further north, where there are few rodents, antlers can go unscathed for years.
     
  6. IAdroptine

    IAdroptine PMA Member

    Messages:
    646
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Dakota Dunes, SD USA
    I found a fresh shed on Sunday that the tree rats must have watched drop and then fought over. Then 30 minutes later I kicked the tip off a shed buried in the dirt with just inches of exposed tips jutting out of the ground. After digging far awhile I discovered the match at the same spot. They lay in the grasses for years, all but consumed by Mother Nature.

    Antlers left in the timbers in my part of Iowa will be little more than a stub of main beam by bow season.
     
  7. Blackfoot

    Blackfoot New Member

    Messages:
    213
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Iowa
    IA droptine, you mentioned that you had broken a point off of a shed when you unknowingly stepped on it... something similiar to that happened to me ... a year old antler I found this past weekend appeared to have been stepped on by someone or something. The browtine had been pushed over and partially broken but remand attached to the beam. It was a first for me...
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice