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mock rub/scrape trees

Interesting note on the Basswood trees. I know we have them in Lincoln as ornamentals, but I had to do a little research to see if they were native to Nebraska. I guess they are along the eastern border along the Missouri River, but probably not in my area. I wish they were because this is the second year I have done this and have had great success. A friend of mine from northeast NE exclusively uses 4x4 cedar posts from Menards to inventory the bucks on his property. In a presentation he gave on scouting two years ago at the Nebraska Bowhunters Association banquet, he showed how these become perennial sign post rubs, sort of like fire hydrants for dogs. When they wear thin or break off he plants a new one in the ground. Thanks for the info!
 

Daver

PMA Member
A little more info on the basswood trees...several years ago on my farm I noticed that there were a few trees that got shredded every year and at least one of them was in a very hard to reach spot. I found this peculiar, so I suspected that there was something about that tree that drew the bucks every year. The tree was about 2/3 the way up a very steep creek bank. A buck would have to be part billy goat to rub on it since it was on such a steep side hill, but rub it they did...every year, with a vengeance.

I later looked at the tree while it was still leafed out and determined it was a basswood tree. And then I doubled back and looked at some of the other perennial rub trees and found that several of them were also basswoods. Most of these basswoods were near creek beds FWIW. Note, small to medium sized cedar trees were #2 on the perennial rub list.
So now, I look for basswoods and pretty much can count on them getting rubbed every year.

This past spring I was on a farm tour with a group of hunters that included a professional forester with a degree from ISU. We came up on a clump of basswood trees and every one of them was shredded and the host explained to us that this area was torn up with rubs every year. A couple of us talked amongst ourselves briefly and it turns out that each of us had observed the "basswood phenomenon".
 
Interesting note on the Basswood trees. I know we have them in Lincoln as ornamentals, but I had to do a little research to see if they were native to Nebraska. I guess they are along the eastern border along the Missouri River, but probably not in my area. I wish they were because this is the second year I have done this and have had great success. A friend of mine from northeast NE exclusively uses 4x4 cedar posts from Menards to inventory the bucks on his property. In a presentation he gave on scouting two years ago at the Nebraska Bowhunters Association banquet, he showed how these become perennial sign post rubs, sort of like fire hydrants for dogs. When they wear thin or break off he plants a new one in the ground. Thanks for the info!

Is there much for other trees in the areas he puts these? If so, any of these get rubbed, or do they stick to the posts?

A little more info on the basswood trees...several years ago on my farm I noticed that there were a few trees that got shredded every year and at least one of them was in a very hard to reach spot. I found this peculiar, so I suspected that there was something about that tree that drew the bucks every year. The tree was about 2/3 the way up a very steep creek bank. A buck would have to be part billy goat to rub on it since it was on such a steep side hill, but rub it they did...every year, with a vengeance.

I later looked at the tree while it was still leafed out and determined it was a basswood tree. And then I doubled back and looked at some of the other perennial rub trees and found that several of them were also basswoods. Most of these basswoods were near creek beds FWIW. Note, small to medium sized cedar trees were #2 on the perennial rub list.
So now, I look for basswoods and pretty much can count on them getting rubbed every year.

This past spring I was on a farm tour with a group of hunters that included a professional forester with a degree from ISU. We came up on a clump of basswood trees and every one of them was shredded and the host explained to us that this area was torn up with rubs every year. A couple of us talked amongst ourselves briefly and it turns out that each of us had observed the "basswood phenomenon".

I gotta find some basswood. My rub trees (have tried willow and cedar) don't seem to get much action, but I suppose the location could be part of it as well. Maybe I don't have enough buck activity where I have tried them.
 
Yes, there is lots of timber (cedars, ash, cottonwood. hackberry, etc). However, if I recall correctly he selects open areas along heavilly used trails and near food plots. He roughs them up with a wood rasp initially, so I have no doubt it's the visual attraction at first. Once one deer rubs it, it's probably like a well used fire hydrant at a dog run. The aroma of the cedar probably helps too.
 
Waiting in line. While the ash has received some attention this fall, they really do like the cedar best.
 

Daver

PMA Member
Great picture! A little on the large side, but great nonetheless. :D

Next year I will copy off of your multi-species idea and put out a sampling of trees, all about 5' from each other, to log preferences. It won't rise to the level of the Bonker trapping cam, but it could be fun to watch.
 

gunhunter

PMA Member
Used a willow about the size of me and it worked awesome. Ill try to get some pics up later night. Lots of sighn
 

gunhunter

PMA Member
I put on along a corn field I hunted over and was extremely happy with results. Was already a hang out area.
A young one with an awesome future I believe


Seen this guy on foot a few times. Hoping to catch up to him next year. I call him Jameis.


And one that showed up for a few days during the rut. No history other than a few pics. Cool 6x4
 

northcedar

Active Member
Any updates or pics from anyone? I placed 2 cedars and now have cams on both. Will give them a couple weeks. I need to find some willows somewhere.
 

6x6

PMA Member
I put my 1st trees in on 8/26 as the bucks were about to strip velvet, and starting to concentrate on the acorns and fall food plots. Alot of sniffing and scent marking at first.





This guy thinks he is the boss of the feeding area and runs everyone away from "his" tree.














This little punk went nuts all night, over the 4+" tree, by my house.







There won't be any branches left on these by October.
 
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MO-APE

Member
Pretty cool, the same suspects come back year-after-year to my mock scrape/rub tree planted in the same place. This may not be the same buck, if not he is definitely his son. Not a giant, but love using this tactic to capture pics. I can count on a good 1000 pics a week by every buck that visits this field. I also have weekly fights from August to early Feb. Last year, I think I used a young maple tree...this year, a cedar and not seeing any measurable difference.

2014


2015
 

MO-APE

Member
They are back at it, captured some great fights on 12/17 & 12/19. Literally three or four times a week bucks square up by this mock scrape / rub tree.

12/17 Fights:




12/19 Matchup:


 

6x6

PMA Member
I like fresh Willow, Cedar or Basswood works real good too. I have put in a few bushy ones all ready that I will swap out with bigger trees, early October.



 
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